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  • Dog collars for Airline Passengers

    This is truly ripe for abuse:

    http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=69116

  • #2
    Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

    Originally posted by jedi View Post
    That's nothing new, they stole that idea from Running Man, who stole it from Star Trek. I bet 100,000 Quatluu's that it will never get adopted.
    A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

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    • #3
      Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

      There was a time when I would have thought an idea like this would never even be seriously considered, but with all the increases in security (as well as fear-mongering) by the administration I'm no longer sure.

      Going to the airport is like walking into an Orwellian dystopia... surveillance cameras everywhere, signs and announcements proclaiming the terror alert threat levels, lines of people marching like cattle through metal detectors, the occasional armed guard... and the past two times I've left the country I've been interrogated by customs agents asking me if I've lived in Ohio (I never have).
      One Nation Under Surveillance
      "War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength."

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      • #4
        Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

        It'll never happen. The pilot's union simply won't fly because they're subject to the same security precautions as the rest of us - even if they're exempted, some security officer somewhere won't realize that and will try to slap one on a pilot. (I've already seen a pilot held up at a security checkpoint because he lacked a boarding pass and "airline ID isn't good enough")

        And if by some disaster it does get implemented, I'll sooner spend $1500 in gas to drive than $55 for an airline ticket.

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        • #5
          Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

          Originally posted by Wing View Post
          It'll never happen. The pilot's union simply won't fly because they're subject to the same security precautions as the rest of us - even if they're exempted, some security officer somewhere won't realize that and will try to slap one on a pilot. (I've already seen a pilot held up at a security checkpoint because he lacked a boarding pass and "airline ID isn't good enough")

          And if by some disaster it does get implemented, I'll sooner spend $1500 in gas to drive than $55 for an airline ticket.
          While I agree that it's highly unlikely to get implemented, it's just as scary that it's being considered (as Samurai pointed out). Issues like liability (people have had heart attacks from the use of tasers on them) and abuse come to mind when I think of what's possible if it's put into service. There are just so many ways this could go wrong.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

            Originally posted by jedi View Post
            I've tried to ignore this, considering the recent foray into silliness with the anonymous room thing, but I just have to point out a couple of small flaws in all this sturm und drang. For the command line enabled, just doing a quick search on the origins of the story (washingtontimes.com) will give you a hint. The day I start taking a rag written by Moonies seriously is the day I subscribe to Weekly World News.

            Although it purports to be considered by the DHS, the actual person mentioned is over at the Tech Center for the FAA, which is not exactly Security Central for dot gov. There's even a comment on the original Washington Times blog (if you read down far enough) that makes the point that this NEVER happened.

            http://www.washingtontimes.com/weblo...-your-peanuts/

            Jeeze, guys, check the sources first, yes?

            Moonies? Seriously?

            So that you don't have to go off and read the crazy postings, here's the comment of which I spoke:

            +++
            By: S&Tspokesman
            Shocking, but False

            Sometimes it just amazes me how these stories evolve. Let me start off by saying that the Department of Homeland Security’s Science & Technology Directorate nor TSA have been pursuing shock bracelets for airline passengers as alleged by the Washington Times Blog.

            This allegation stemmed from a misleading video posted on the Lamberd Website which depicts an ID bracelet that would contain identifying information as well as the ability to stun the wearer. The company claims to connect use of such a device to DHS and TSA, but no discussions between these agencies has ever taken place.

            This all originated from a meeting held two years ago with a private company representative (not Lamberd) who proposed bracelet technology in response to the TSA's desire to find less-than-lethal means to detain an apprehended suspect.

            The bracelet was never intended to replace boarding passes, contain ID information or be worn by all passengers as asserted in the Lamberd video and discussed in the Washington Times Blog.

            The hypothetical use of the bracelet would have been for transporting already apprehended prisoners and detainees at prisons and border patrol facilities, and DHS was looking to see if there were potential air travel applications for apprehended suspects.

            This concept was never funded or supported by the DHS or TSA and hasn’t even been discussed for two years. The letter circulating throughout the blogosphere from Paul Ruwaldt was not addressed to Lamberd and merely states the DHS was interested in learning more about the technology. Neither side followed up.

            DHS/TSA does NOT support the asserted use and has not pursued the development of such technology.
            +++

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            • #7
              Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

              Originally posted by shrdlu View Post
              The day I start taking a rag written by Moonies seriously is the day I subscribe to Weekly World News.
              ...
              Jeeze, guys, check the sources first, yes?

              Moonies? Seriously?
              Without going too far down the slippery slope of politics, the fact that Sun Myung Moon founded the paper and potentially has some editorial influence over the paper doesn't necessarily make it a worthless source. To dismiss the Times simply because of who founded it is silly. Every newspaper has big financial backers behind it, and certainly those people have political preferences that may wield editorial influence as well. I'm not suggesting that the Washington Times is without bias or political leanings, because it certainly is. But, so is every other source of news media.

              This article seems to be a lack of research and fact-checking on the part of the writer. That's pretty common among all journalists these days. Notice how all the major newspapers published the photo-chopped image of four Iranian missiles being launched (when in reality it was three missiles):
              "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                Originally posted by theprez98 View Post
                This article seems to be a lack of research and fact-checking on the part of the writer. That's pretty common among all journalists these days. Notice how all the major newspapers published the photo-chopped image of four Iranian missiles being launched (when in reality it was three missiles):
                I had seen better photochopping of G8tk33p3r's hair than that picture. they didn't even take the time to even out the color of the sky on the inserted missle.
                A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                  MSNBC has an article on the photo-chopped picture,and the original, showing the fourth missile in the ground.

                  http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/archi...0/1191157.aspx
                  Thorn
                  "If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning." - Catherine Aird

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                    Yea, check the rag first!
                    Last edited by Greyhatter; July 10, 2008, 16:34.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                      Originally posted by theprez98 View Post
                      Without going too far down the slippery slope of politics, the fact that Sun Myung Moon founded the paper and potentially has some editorial influence over the paper doesn't necessarily make it a worthless source. To dismiss the Times simply because of who founded it is silly. Every newspaper has big financial backers behind it, and certainly those people have political preferences that may wield editorial influence as well. I'm not suggesting that the Washington Times is without bias or political leanings, because it certainly is. But, so is every other source of news media.
                      shrdlu's makes a good point. I should have dug deeper before posting. But I found the article's idea interesting enough that regardless of the validity of the source, the fact that it was being considered (even for use on transporting prisoners) is scary.

                      As to the politically (or religiously) motivated starting print media to advance their ideas, it's not a new concept. Hearst and Pulitzer were two good examples of being very successful at it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                        Originally posted by jedi View Post
                        shrdlu's makes a good point. I should have dug deeper before posting.
                        Ok just for the sake of the argument jedi..

                        http://www.washingtontimes.com/weblo...-your-peanuts/

                        I bet 300,000 Quatluu's, and a night with Shanna that this won't happen due to the "defect rule" that applies here. It is a given in electronics that a percentage of all mass assembly units are defective no matter how good quality control is. For consumer electronics it's around 5 to 15% failure out of the box. The bracelets that will be defective will either not work in a terrorist event when they must, or will go off without cause because they are defective and shock an innocent passenger out of the blue. I wonder what would happen if you bang one of these bracelets on something real hard and submerse it in water afterward (wash your hands)? If these things use batteries how many will be dead some or most of the time? I think I will apply for the "battery guy" job with gov't benefits!

                        DHS have a bunch of ninnies working on these ideas? I begin to wonder why I or anyone should pay taxes beyond roads and local policing in this country with such idiots in charge. BTW, I already gave up on the mainstream media long ago.
                        Last edited by Greyhatter; July 10, 2008, 16:52.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                          Originally posted by Greyhatter View Post
                          Ok just for the sake of the argument jedi..

                          http://www.washingtontimes.com/weblo...-your-peanuts/

                          I bet 300,000 Quatluu's, and a night with Shanna that this won't happen due to the "defect rule" that applies here. It is a given in electronics that a percentage of all mass assembly units are defective no matter how good quality control is. For consumer electronics it's around 5 to 15% failure out of the box. The bracelets that will be defective will either not work in a terrorist event when they must, or will go off without cause because they are defective and shock an innocent passenger out of the blue. I wonder what would happen if you bang one of these bracelets on something real hard and submerse it in water afterward (wash your hands)? If these things use batteries how many will be dead some or most of the time? I think I will apply for the "battery guy" job with gov't benefits!

                          DHS have a bunch of ninnies working on these ideas? I begin to wonder why I or anyone should pay taxes beyond roads and local policing in this country with such idiots in charge. BTW, I already gave up on the mainstram media long ago.
                          Of course, they could always buy those really good batteries from Sony, you know the ones they've been putting in Laptops that have been spontaneously catching fire.

                          As for the previous statement of using them for prisoner transports, they should have three levels.

                          1. Warning beeps that they're about to be shocked.
                          2. A mild electric shock.
                          3. 1oz of C4 detonates.

                          Then we could setup invisible fence zones to keep the prisoners in.
                          A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                            Originally posted by streaker69 View Post
                            3. 1oz of C4 detonates.
                            Even those guys from Triskelion in the M-24 Alpha star system had more mercy. Ouch

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Dog collars for Airline Passengers

                              What was the movie that had prisoners with explosive collars matched to another prisoner? if the two got far enough apart, they exploded...

                              EDIT: Wedlock...Rutger Hauer.
                              "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

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