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Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

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  • SmittyHalibut
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by afterburn188 View Post
    Then I got spoiled when I used a Metcal it was like night and day!
    I do love me my Metcal...

    Leave a comment:


  • bombnav
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by afterburn188 View Post
    A cool one for Windows/Linux is SIMetrix. There is a free licensed version that's only limitation is the number of transistors you can use (plenty of room to make some fun amplifiers). It also allows for Digital simulation as well. KTechLab is a cool program for Digital Logic. I'll chuck these up on the wiki...
    Cool I'll check this one out.

    Leave a comment:


  • afterburn188
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    A cool one for Windows/Linux is SIMetrix. There is a free licensed version that's only limitation is the number of transistors you can use (plenty of room to make some fun amplifiers). It also allows for Digital simulation as well. KTechLab is a cool program for Digital Logic. I'll chuck these up on the wiki...

    Leave a comment:


  • bombnav
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    I am sure alot of you now about this but I just stumbled on it.

    http://focus.ti.com/docs/toolsw/fold...t/tina-ti.html

    A free schematic Editor from TI.

    Here is the blurp on the web site
    "TINA is an easy-to-use, but powerful, circuit simulation program based on a SPICE engine. TINA-TI is a fully functional version of TINA, loaded with a library of TI macromodels plus passive and active models."



    Something else to play with.

    Leave a comment:


  • LosT
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    A few thoughts:

    1. Don't *abuse* sampling, or you will bork the system for the rest of us- translation: don't be stupid about how you request samples. With the recession going on, I would hate for companies to simply stop sampling- I sample all the time- so be smart about it. Most of the time you can get away with a sub-$100 order every two months or so. Some other companies watch more closely. Just be smart about it.

    2. Cold heat irons suck. Period. If you use one on anything electrical, you don't understand how it works. It is NOT good to use on electronics, period. End of story. This isn't the iron you are looking for. Move along. (If you HAVE to have an iron to take easily with you, get a cheap electrical iron- when are you ever in a position where you need to solder electronics that you don't have a plug? And on that RARE occasion that you are, you can get butane based irons)

    3. Everyone keeps asking for a 'suggested parts list', as well as a 'suggested tools list'- I would like to work with the CVORG guys in putting this together because they did such a good job in getting the HHV wiki up and running. Stay tuned for more info on this.

    4. There will be actual kits for sale again in the vendor area this year. In fact there will be several. I can neither confirm nor deny that the circuits, designs/kits that will be for sale will be designed in tandem with badge hacking in mind.

    5. Since everyone is talking about irons they like, I have to say I'm still partial to my hakko. Find an iron YOU like, or ask to use a nice iron before buying. Just because someone else likes a particular iron doesn't mean you will. You DON'T need to spend a fortune on an iron to get started. Once you have used a nice iron it's painful to use a crappy one though.

    6. Ada's list for samples is good, but it has been posted long enough to have been abused. There are many other places to sample from, if interested, ask me at con. I will not post publicly here, as I don't want my personal sources destroyed due to a public forum post.

    7. I don't want to get into the religious wars about which micro is better uControllers are everywhere these days, and there are many, many great ones. Microchip is releasing new C compilers FOR FREE for all three lines (8bit on up)- Check their website. AVRs can be gotten into cheaply. SXes aren't bad, ask Joe Grand, he used several in product designs in the past. The programmer can be expensive though. The propeller is interesting, give it a look for fun. Freescale has some amazing uControllers. As does Ti. Pick a platform, start there. Don't let others deter you from your micro of choice. Most people have wacked opinions of certain controllers and wind up using an inappropriate controller for a particular job because of it. If you want a slick dev platform, check out the MSP430 dev tool from Ti. It fits in your pocket, is cheap, and pretty cool. It looks like a USB thumb drive.

    Ok, more later. Still in Norway.

    LosT

    Leave a comment:


  • streaker69
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    A good suggestion for any kind of 'road warrior' tech that needs to carry Lots of tools with them, I recommend these:

    http://www.stanleysupplyservices.com/search.aspx?c=419

    I had one where I had worked about 10 years ago, and it was able to carry just about anything I'd need. After I left there, I bought one myself. You can mix and match different pallets to suit your own needs. You can also order pallets pre-populated with tools.

    I had mine at Shmoo this year, so some may have seen it there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rover
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    OK, I started a high-level tools list in the wiki with some potential suppliers. Feel free to make suggestions for specific models of irons, etc. at different price levels.

    Leave a comment:


  • afterburn188
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Just to clarify as there may have been some confusion. I am not looking to build kits or market them at the HHV in any way. My idea was that many people may be looking to assemble kits for the HHV but more importantly hardware hacking in general. The idea can be compared to BackTrack. You could go around and research all the hot programs, compile them, and install them on top of whatever distro you run. Or you could download BackTrack (or just get their list of packaged software which is what I did in the past). My idea is to give people a place to come look at and go "okay i want to build a kit, what should I have in it?" The ideas being listed here are great! Now let's transfer some of them to the wiki!
    Last edited by afterburn188; February 13, 2009, 12:45. Reason: plug the wiki

    Leave a comment:


  • bombnav
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by A View Post
    I think that if we check enough cabinets in the skyboxes they might still be there this year. I don't think a hotel employee knows about ewaste and rhos, so I think we were fine leaving it with the other trash.
    Yea after living in California for 7 years I forget sometimes how the rest of the world operates.

    Leave a comment:


  • A
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by bombnav View Post
    BTW what happened to the left overs.. was there a disposal issue with them? Just wondering as I had to leave before DC was over.
    I think that if we check enough cabinets in the skyboxes they might still be there this year. I don't think a hotel employee knows about ewaste and rhos, so I think we were fine leaving it with the other trash.

    Leave a comment:


  • bombnav
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by streaker69 View Post
    I agree with this as well. I have one, and I would only use it in an emergency repairing wire connections that don't have anything connected to the other end.

    Their commercial showed them using it on circuit boards, and after I got it and saw how it worked I figured it was pretty much crap for that kind of work. The last time I used it was at a remote station to jump a pair of pins on a DB9 connector.

    I've considered getting one of those little butane irons for use in the field when electricity isn't handy.

    I have one of those butane ones and you have to be real careful as most have some kind of exhaust port on the side and you will burn stuff up fast.

    I guess the best protable solution is a small gas generator to power a good iron. The small 1WK ones for under $200.

    As for the kits, this year I am going to clean out my "lab" and bring what I can in the way of parts and used circuit boards since they were so popular last year. BTW what happened to the left overs.. was there a disposal issue with them? Just wondering as I had to leave before DC was over.

    Leave a comment:


  • DCFluX
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    I'd recommend the inclusion of some of the Atmel AVR series of micro controllers.

    Specifically:
    ATTINY45
    ATMEGA8
    ATMEGA644P

    All of these can run with the internal oscillator and can be programed with a parallel port.

    For transistors I like the 2N2222, TO-92 version, MMBT2222 for surface mount.

    Some resistors, to keep it simple use 100 ohms, 1K, 10K and 100K, maybe also include the half steps of 47, 470, 4.7K and 47K, all 1/4 watt

    some caps, lots of 0.1uF non polar, couple of 0.01 and .001, 1uF 10uF and 100uF aluminum electrolytic.

    Also some 78L05s and or 1N5231B 5.1V zener diodes for power regulation.

    Leave a comment:


  • streaker69
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by valkyrie View Post
    Yeah, to anyone who wants to do some serious stuff to electronics, stay away from a Cold Heat. It's great for repairing things around the house, but don't dare touch it to your precious circuit boards. Get an old fashioned swivel ended iron and learn with that.

    Learn from my experience...

    Regards,

    Valkyrie
    __________________________________________________ _________
    sapere aude
    I agree with this as well. I have one, and I would only use it in an emergency repairing wire connections that don't have anything connected to the other end.

    Their commercial showed them using it on circuit boards, and after I got it and saw how it worked I figured it was pretty much crap for that kind of work. The last time I used it was at a remote station to jump a pair of pins on a DB9 connector.

    I've considered getting one of those little butane irons for use in the field when electricity isn't handy.

    Leave a comment:


  • afterburn188
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by valkyrie View Post
    Yeah, to anyone who wants to do some serious stuff to electronics, stay away from a Cold Heat. It's great for repairing things around the house, but don't dare touch it to your precious circuit boards. Get an old fashioned swivel ended iron and learn with that.

    Learn from my experience...

    Regards,

    Valkyrie
    __________________________________________________ _________
    sapere aude
    I for one have also made this mistake. Then I got spoiled when I used a Metcal it was like night and day! The power meter on them is also good for telling when you've finally heated something up while trying to disassemble

    Leave a comment:


  • valkyrie
    replied
    Re: Hardware Hack Kit Ideas

    Originally posted by Rover View Post
    Someone new to HH would benefit from knowing what to include in their tackle box before heading off to the Con. I'm thinking it would be useful to recommend Good, Better, and Best starter tool kits like Lady Ada describes here:
    http://www.ladyada.net/library/equipt/kits.html

    This gives a few options based on level of interest and how much cash they want to lay out before deciding if its really for them.
    Yeah, to anyone who wants to do some serious stuff to electronics, stay away from a Cold Heat. It's great for repairing things around the house, but don't dare touch it to your precious circuit boards. Get an old fashioned swivel ended iron and learn with that.

    Learn from my experience...

    Regards,

    Valkyrie
    __________________________________________________ _________
    sapere aude

    Leave a comment:

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