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  • bjaming
    replied
    Re: Deep packet inspection

    the ISP does not have the home user's best interests in mind, this isn't being done to protect 'IPTV' or 'VoIP' it's being done to protect the traffic of those with the money, the big corporate monsters that employ MPLS networks which are essentially tunnelled over the 'net via a number of mechanisms or the googles and yahoos with billions of page hits and that pay tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars a month week or minute to have the bandwidth to support it.

    Meanwhile, the crumbling infrastructure at just about every major metropolitan area is being ignored, unless it's outside a shiny new office building with very deep pockets and loud whiny lawyers.

    end user traffic will be 'best effort' at the very best and nothing more than that.


    of course I could be wrong, there's always a first time for everything isn't there?

    :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • bascule
    replied
    Re: Deep packet inspection

    Originally posted by burncycle View Post
    This is a brilliant idea, but in my opinion this deep packet inspection thing is just the ISPs preparing for the death of net neutrality.
    Pretty much... the ISPs are trying to classify traffic so they can set the QoS policy which is most profitable to them.

    I have no problem with an ISP say, nerfing the QoS of ALL Internet traffic when you're using their IPTV service or something. But this pick-and-choose crap is pretty annoying.

    Leave a comment:


  • burncycle
    replied
    Re: Deep packet inspection

    Originally posted by YenTheFirst View Post
    The thought I had just now - any customer marks their own packets for QoS, but they're limited. On the basic plan you get, say, 1GB worth of High-Priority in a month, and everything else is automatically treated as normal. You could mark your voip as high-priority, if that's what you want, but you couldn't mark an entire season of your favorite TV show on bittorent, because you would run out of priority.
    This is a brilliant idea, but in my opinion this deep packet inspection thing is just the ISPs preparing for the death of net neutrality. Whether net neutrality actually dies is a horse of a different color.

    Originally posted by YenTheFirst View Post
    gah. now this seems like the ideal, perfect solution, which means there's something obvious and boneheaded I'm missing. anyone care to point it out to me?
    There always is, but I don't see it either.

    Leave a comment:


  • YenTheFirst
    replied
    Re: Deep packet inspection

    hmm. I'd like a couple things in life - an unblocked port 80, and fair/open QoS.

    The thought I had just now - any customer marks their own packets for QoS, but they're limited. On the basic plan you get, say, 1GB worth of High-Priority in a month, and everything else is automatically treated as normal. You could mark your voip as high-priority, if that's what you want, but you couldn't mark an entire season of your favorite TV show on bittorent, because you would run out of priority.

    If the ISP, and their peers, respect the QoS correctly, everyone's happy. No deep packet inspection required, and if the customer is worried about VOIP latencies they can set up their client/router/whatever to mark the correct packets as the correct priority. As a plus to the ISPs, they don't have to invest in deep-packet technologies, and they don't have to worry about the whole encryption thing. The customer can set their own QoS, but they can't abuse it.

    gah. now this seems like the ideal, perfect solution, which means there's something obvious and boneheaded I'm missing. anyone care to point it out to me?

    two points on edit:
    the linked article fears the 'balkanization' of the internet. I'm not sure that would be financially desirable for the ISPs involved, but that's me.
    Also, would free-market economics magically sort this out if the barrier to entry for broadband ISPs was magically lower?

    Leave a comment:


  • streaker69
    replied
    Re: Deep packet inspection

    Originally posted by bascule View Post
    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/n...ction-mean.ars

    Some ISPs are planning on or already using deep inspection of user traffic to prioritize it or do other things to it like try to block it. Video streams from partners can go faster, video streams from competitors get crappy QoS, etc.

    P2P protocols, on the other hand, are now employing inter-node crypto and random ports in order to thwart deep packet inspection.

    What's your take on all of this?
    I'm fairly torn on this issue. I think that ISP should do some kind of traffic management, but they should not be actively canceling transfers of legal data.

    With the growth of VoIP it would be nice to see QOS implemented across the majority of the internet so that gets precedence as a phone call is a little annoying with dropped packets.

    I think ISP's should be more honest in regards to 'unlimited' plans and make their limits clear and in big text right at the top of the plan description.

    I do have a problem of ISP's doing deep packet inspection, as the packet header should be more than enough information to do proper traffic management.

    Of course, I'm not too terribly big into the whole P2P thing, and only started using bittorrent to download TV shows, and I've noticed that when I run it here I lose my gateway IP address every so often, but when I'm not running it, it never drops.

    Most strange..

    Leave a comment:


  • bascule
    started a topic Deep packet inspection

    Deep packet inspection

    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/n...ction-mean.ars

    Some ISPs are planning on or already using deep inspection of user traffic to prioritize it or do other things to it like try to block it. Video streams from partners can go faster, video streams from competitors get crappy QoS, etc.

    P2P protocols, on the other hand, are now employing inter-node crypto and random ports in order to thwart deep packet inspection.

    What's your take on all of this?
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