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Automation with scripts, batch files, etc (was:Getting started in the security field)

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  • bascule
    replied
    Re: Getting started in the security field

    Originally posted by Cipher View Post
    I am aware that Batch Scripting can make you system administration tasks a lot easier through automation.
    It's an interesting topic despite the necromancy. Two open source tools have sprung up which are practically different implementations of the same idea ("infrastructure automation"), and both in the Ruby programming language at that:

    Puppet: http://www.puppetlabs.com/
    Chef: http://opscode.com/chef/

    Leave a comment:


  • Cipher
    replied
    Re: Getting started in the security field

    Originally posted by TheCotMan View Post
    Here is one warning on your reply: you replied to an old post within a thread. See 7. Old Threads: for details. Replying to a post from 2004 resurrects an old discussion and risks the possibility of replying to someone that no longer frequents the forums.
    Oh my goodness, I Apologize for that Cot. I didn't realized it was so old. I saw it in the "Community talk Lobby" and clicked it. It won't happen again. Also Thanks for you're reply it was very helpful, Very.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Re: Getting started in the security field

    This is, however, not on topic for "getting started in the security field" but instead a new, forked topic. As a result, I am forking posts related to this to a new thread.

    The two top posts were copied from the original thread. Your post has been moved to this thread to keep it on-topic to "getting started in the security field."

    Here is one warning on your reply: you replied to an old post within a thread. See 7. Old Threads: for details. Replying to a post from 2004 resurrects an old discussion and risks the possibility of replying to someone that no longer frequents the forums. You would have been better off starting a new thread with commentary on the discussion from the old thread because it was a new topic, and the previous discussion was 6 years old. This is provided as commentary for helping you to get around on the forums. Good luck!

    Regardless, it has potential for a discussion of value, so time was taken to pull relevant posts from the original and fork a new thread for discussion.

    Originally posted by Cipher
    That sounds like a great advice. Here's a question. Can you use any programming language to make programs to pretty much do anything?

    Say, interact with the google Mail server through the Command Line Shell (I guess if you code with C++) instead if using your browsing? If any of this makes any sense.
    I'm pretty sure AlxRogan could, as could many people on these forums.

    There are not many classes of things that are "too difficult" to automate through a non-GUI, command-line programs or scripting language when you have the right tools. There are many tools "out there" that take advantage of google mail without running a GUI-based web browser.

    For example:
    * http://richard.jones.name/google-hac...ilesystem.html -> http://sr71.net/projects/gmailfs/ (Turn a "gmail mailbox" into a "network filesystem" -- where is your GUI-web browser when you use this?)

    Additionally, enabling support to use IMAP/POP with mail servers allows people to use command-line based tools to interact with their mail server, or use a curses/ncurses-based application launched from the command-line, or check to see if you have new mail.

    I am aware that Batch Scripting can make you system administration tasks a lot easier through automation.

    Just Curious.
    Yes. Today I visited several hundred servers with simple command-line scripts to ensure certain things on the servers were they way they should have been. This is common for cases where "disposable code" is helpful. Anything that would want to be checked more often than that would be added to a service like snmp, rmon, or polling-service (scraping, or other direct/indirect request) and then tracked with other software.
    Last edited by TheCotMan; February 1, 2011, 19:30.

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  • Cipher
    replied
    Re: Getting started in the security field

    Originally posted by AlxRogan View Post
    I'd have to disagree here. I know that people come into security every day without any background of coding/scripting or any type of automation, but when you start working on larger projects it becomes an extremely necessary skill. Anytime you look at rolling out large patch deployments, or changing security settings on multiple machines, some type of coding/scripting should come into play, unless you are really keen on consoling into every box and doing it manually. :)

    Don't dismiss that idea that knowledge of code isn't a very important one in security. It may not be everyone's jumping off point, but they should at least consider it.

    That sounds like a great advice. Here's a question. Can you use any programming language to make programs to pretty much do anything?

    Say, interact with the google Mail server through the Command Line Shell (I guess if you code with C++) instead if using your browsing? If any of this makes any sense.

    I am aware that Batch Scripting can make you system administration tasks a lot easier through automation.

    Just Curious.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlxRogan
    replied
    Originally posted by Brandito
    -skroo

    Good link... as far as something I am wanting to look into.
    I do think the guy was full of bull shit when he said:

    I guess it is all about what you want to specialize in... but still... the guys about two legs and a chode away from having his head up his ass.
    I'd have to disagree here. I know that people come into security every day without any background of coding/scripting or any type of automation, but when you start working on larger projects it becomes an extremely necessary skill. Anytime you look at rolling out large patch deployments, or changing security settings on multiple machines, some type of coding/scripting should come into play, unless you are really keen on consoling into every box and doing it manually. :)

    Don't dismiss that idea that knowledge of code isn't a very important one in security. It may not be everyone's jumping off point, but they should at least consider it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brandito
    replied
    -skroo

    Good link... as far as something I am wanting to look into.
    I do think the guy was full of bull shit when he said:
    the ability to at least read code, and ideally program a little bit
    I guess it is all about what you want to specialize in... but still... the guys about two legs and a chode away from having his head up his ass.

    Leave a comment:


  • Automation with scripts, batch files, etc (was:Getting started in the security field)

    I would recommend that anyone considering entering the security field read this piece that ran on Securityfocus today. While by no means comprehensive (it almost entirely omits systems security, concentrating mainly on the network side of things), it does provide an overview of certain basic things you will need to know in order to be able to get a foot in the door.
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