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  • Hacking and the military

    Hi,

    I'm interested in going into the Air Force right out of high school, and am thinking about getting involved in the intelligence carrer field (probably 1n5). I've been interested in computers since age 5, and my dad is a system administrator, so I've picked up a little bit about computer security. This is encouraging me to study for the CCNA, which I'll probably take this summer.
    I'm convinced that the best way to learn about computer security is to attempt to exploit it, and would like to do this for the government, after or during my application at the air force. I've talked to people who know people at lackland that hack into systems at remote installations, which carrer track would this fall under?
    Does anyone have any information about the government liasons whom attended previous DEFCON conferences with information on recruitment? I'd like to contact them.

    Sincerely,
    "DoYouKnow"
    - A sophomore in high school

  • #2
    why would you like to work for the government? there are sooomany other companys out there that would probably pay better.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jetforce4004
      why would you like to work for the government? there are sooomany other companys out there that would probably pay better.
      Clearly you haven't been in the job market lately. And there are a lot of other advantages that go along with military (not to be confused with 'government') service: paid college tuition, training, looks great on a resume if you leave the service and go back into the civilian market, etc. Granted, there's a good chance you might have to go somewhere where you'll possibly get your ass shot off, but what it offers is way better than most.

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      • #4
        If you exploit computers, make sure they are all yours and on your network. Don't exploit or hack mine or anyone else's. That will zap your career opportunities, both military and civilian. It's akin to robing a bank to test bank security. Not a good idea really. If you do want to test out other systems go ahead and get writen permission before hand, then record your tests and make the whole thing as official as possible, like a consultant would do. Things like this can net you an extra stripe upon enlistment.

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        • #5
          You probably want "Communications Computer Systems Control". While not directly related to hacking per se, it will get you on the right track. You would set up and secure networks and electronic phone systems. So it's ideal for the hacker/phreaker.

          You will need to get a security clearance though, so stop touching that 8 yr old neighbor in her special spot.
          .: Grifter :.

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          • #6
            You will need to get a security clearance though, so stop touching that 8 yr old neighbor in her special spot.

            lol.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Audiosplice
              lol.
              What? It's true.
              .: Grifter :.

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              • #8
                Does that mean she can't touch my special spot either?

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                • #9
                  It was my understanding that all military personnel have Secret level security clearance just with the checks they do when you join the military, which is good for 2 years after you leave the military. I've seen many jobs looking for people with prior secret or top secret security clearance because it's a long time consuming hassle waiting for your clearance to be processed, and they rather put you to work right away then wait for someones clearance to be issued.
                  "Just when I thought I was out.......They pull me back in"
                  - Neural's Godfather moment

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Neural
                    It was my understanding that all military personnel have Secret level security clearance just with the checks they do when you join the military, which is good for 2 years after you leave the military.
                    No, that is not the case. They do a National Agency Check (NAC) when you join but you only get a clearance (secret or higher) if you are in a job that requires access to classified data.
                    perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

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                    • #11
                      The check you receive when you join the military will normally suffice for a secret clearance. Those clearances are good for 15 years, provided you stay actoive or reserves and in a slot that requires the clearance. Nowdays they pull your clearance they day you leave the military, however it can be reactivated with minimal paperwork should you rejoin the service, usually in 6 months but no lter than 2 years.

                      If you get a civilian job that requires a clearance, they do not have to accept the agency which granted you a clearance in the first place, and while having had one helps a lot, it is not a guarantee of speedy delivery on the new clearance.

                      And lastly, if you have any urges to spend the night with a chicken, do it BEFORE you get your clearance. A lot of the bad things you do in your life can be explained and taken into consideration, but once you are cleared, a higher standard is expected from you, and if you have a clearance pulled it can be very tiring to try to get it back.

                      I bet I can do a Defcon talk for an hour on clearances!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by astcell
                        The check you receive when you join the military will normally suffice for a secret clearance.
                        True...but it isn't automatic. You still have to have need for the clearance and apply before it is granted.


                        Originally posted by astcell

                        I bet I can do a Defcon talk for an hour on clearances!
                        Do it! It would be well attended. There are a lot of folks that would be interested in both the process and the pitfalls.
                        perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

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                        • #13
                          yeah that would be cool, just like i have wanted to know where a person would go to get clearance.
                          "so many books, so little time"

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                          • #14
                            >True...but it isn't automatic. You still have to have need for the clearance and apply before it is granted.

                            Well it is a one page paper, called "Adjudication of Clearance." It's actually a 1/2 page paper! So flimsy, and you do not fill it out, it is done by the administrative folks in the unit. Now it can always come back that you have to fill out the entire stack of paper, that is a case by case basis. The Adjudication can only be done during your first service tour. So if you re-enlist and then need a clearance, it's the whole shebang for you. It used to be that it could be done anytime as long as there was no break in service. And also the clearance for Secret is good for 15 years from the date the investigation was completed, NOT 15 years from when the clearance was issued. So under the old school laws you can join the army in 1980, file for the adjudication in 1994, then the clearance would only be good for 1 year!


                            >Do it! It would be well attended. There are a lot of folks that would be interested in both the process and the pitfalls.

                            I better get clearance for that...from the highest authority...the Mrs....
                            Last edited by astcell; April 16, 2003, 13:00.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ch0l0man
                              yeah that would be cool, just like i have wanted to know where a person would go to get clearance.
                              Well you can't get one like you can a credit card, you have to need it. A background check may take years based on your past, how many places you lived, worked, etc. There are some employers out there who will accept your clearance over a college degree, because it can be cheaper and faster to get a degree, and that's the easy part.

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