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Hacking and the military

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  • erehwon
    replied
    Originally posted by astcell
    They have cool posters too.
    ...and some of them are downright creepy.

    I should move some of the old ones on eBay, I think I might even have a few calendars too.

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    I have a totally cool poster at home, it is an ad to recruit police officer in Chechnya. I thought about tossing it on Ebay but doubt I will ever be back in that AO.

    Leave a comment:


  • murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by astcell
    They have cool posters too.
    definitely cooler than NIPC

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    They have cool posters too.

    Leave a comment:


  • erehwon
    replied
    Select U.S. spy biographies from the National Counterintelligence Executive...

    http://www.ncix.gov/pubs/misc/screen...py_images.html

    Leave a comment:


  • ch0l0man
    replied
    Originally posted by blackwave
    it shows responsibility... if you can't be trusted in the agreement you have with things that you own on daily basis, why should you be trusted with us secrets?
    ah, i figured they would think you would sell u.s. secrets for money to pay your debts.

    Leave a comment:


  • blackwave
    replied
    Originally posted by encrypt31945
    Bad credit really messes up alot of stuff it just takes time to get better credit. Once it has been a couple of years and you paid everything off you are fine again. The thing I didnt know is it could affect if they granted you clearance or not.
    it shows responsibility... if you can't be trusted in the agreement you have with things that you own on daily basis, why should you be trusted with us secrets?

    Leave a comment:


  • ch0l0man
    replied
    yeah and this fool gets granted.

    From late 1997 to late 1999, Applicant's reaction to stress caused him to repeatedly expose himself while driving his car. In 1998 he was arrested for taking indecent liberties with a child and indecent exposure. In 1999, he was again charged with indecent exposure. From January 2000 through January 2001, Applicant received therapy. The counselor believes the Applicant is at low risk to be involved similar inappropriate behavior in the future and sees no reason for concern about the Applicant's judgement. The record evidence is sufficient to mitigate or extenuate the negative security implications stemming from his inappropriate conduct. Clearance is granted.


    what kinda stress would make you act like that?
    and even if you did with a child?
    stress aint gonna make you do that, in my opinion.
    id sure rather have a deadbeat at the company picnic then this jacko.
    Last edited by ch0l0man; April 22, 2003, 23:30.

    Leave a comment:


  • murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by astcell
    So we're not limited to cyber-sex with US citizens!
    Unless they aren't able to pay their cc charges.

    I knew an openly gay person that just delighted in disclosing all their foreign contacts, it was funny to see the security officer's face afterwards.

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    So we're not limited to cyber-sex with US citizens!

    Leave a comment:


  • begformore
    replied
    Originally posted by blackwave
    [BClick here for some fun reading to see what fucktards are out there... and why clearances should exist:
    INDUSTRIAL SECURITY CLEARANCE DECISIONS
    http://www.defenselink.mil/dodgc/doha/industrial/
    [/B]
    Here's my favorite:


    02/21/2003

    Applicant who engaged in Internet cyber-sex with foreign nationals not shown to be foreign agents or exposed to monitoring foreign agents, and who Applicant promptly and voluntarily disclosed as material foreign contacts to DSS in a second DSS interview, mitigates Government's security concerns. Clearance is granted.

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    You can be behind in your bills and trying your hardest, that has some weight. It's the "I don't give a shit" attitude that is the worst, whether it's for overdue bills, abused spouses, or told secrets.

    Leave a comment:


  • encrypt31945
    replied
    Bad credit really messes up alot of stuff it just takes time to get better credit. Once it has been a couple of years and you paid everything off you are fine again. The thing I didnt know is it could affect if they granted you clearance or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    Bad credit means bad credit NOW that you are doing nothing NOW about it. Effort counts, and as bad things go in your past and stay in your past, that's a good thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • blackwave
    replied
    Top Clearance Killers::::
    Bad Credit
    Sustained Drug Use (Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroine)

    Stupid Clearance Killers::::
    Dual citizenship
    Admitting to be suseptible to being coerced/pressured to work against the government.

    Even Stupider Clearance Killers::::
    Admitting to having plans to take over the governemnt.

    Click here for some fun reading to see what fucktards are out there... and why clearances should exist:
    Foreign Influence, Foreign Preference, Financial, Drugs, Personal Conduct, Criminal Conduct, Alcohol, Sexual Behavior, Security Violations, Information Technology, Criminal, Mental
    INDUSTRIAL SECURITY CLEARANCE DECISIONS
    http://www.defenselink.mil/dodgc/doha/industrial/

    Here are some personal favorites:
    CASE NUMBER: 01-07751.h1


    Drugs; Alcohol; Personal Conduct; Criminal Conduct


    03/25/2002


    Applicant was arrested for possession of marijuana in November1997 after having had a security clearance for more than 16 years. She denied any involvement with marijuana in a security questionnaire she completed November 1998. In a March 1999 DSS interview and in two, signed, sworn statements (one written in Appellant's hand) she admitted regular marijuana use from 1979 to 1981 and admitted taking a "couple puffs" in the two years preceding the interview. In a June 1999 interview and in a signed, sworn statement, she admitted using marijuana monthly from 1979 up to and including the night before the interview. Applicant had previously denied using marijuana in security questionnaires she completed in 1988, 1992, and 1995. At her administrative hearing, Applicant admitted using marijuana only 2 or 3 times in her life, all of the use occurring since 1997. Applicant's credibility about past drug use and future intentions has been undermined by her inconsistent and contradictory statements on security questionnaires and in signed sworn statements. Clearance is denied.

    Leave a comment:

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