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Tracing IE visited sites

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  • AlxRogan
    replied
    Originally posted by pc-0x90
    I've been using galeon constantly for the past couple years.. I tried opera (is this really openbsd's only graphical browser?)
    I've used the Netscape 4.xx that came with OBSD 3.3 as well as using the package for Mozilla 1.something under KDE for OBSD 3.4. I rarely ever boot to there, so I don't have much more info, but you can get packages for Mozilla for OBSD if you like.

    FWIW,
    Alx

    Leave a comment:


  • pc-0x90
    replied
    I've been using galeon constantly for the past couple years.. I tried opera (is this really openbsd's only graphical browser?) but there was one thing that bothered me every time..

    Brief side note: I have very bad short term memory and an attention span comparable to a goldfish

    Opera was too polite in the way it crashed. All browsers crash, at least all that I've ever used. I can handle that, no problems. But when galeon chokes, it at least tells you.. pops up a dialog telling you it's going to bail.

    So, if you have a very short attention span, you will totally forget why/if you were browsing until you go to use your browser again..

    crap.. I can't remember if I had a point or not..

    Leave a comment:


  • oz0ne
    replied
    View IE History via index.dat files

    Look for a tool called IE History View. It will show you the contents of the index.dat file that IE keeps.

    Leave a comment:


  • packeteater
    replied
    i like mozilla firefox as opposed to the original(which is also good). I have had several experiences where IE just lets the bs stuff onto my computer like spyware/viruses etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • simon
    replied
    Firebird or um...

    whatever its called now... firefox maybe?

    lighter than mozilla, no extra mail/web editing ware included. it's modular for feature enhancing plugins. the best by far is the adblock plugin. it keeps a db of filters based on key words and or urls of the originating image or link of image. allows for wildcards (ie: http://ads.*.*/* or *ad*)... It can also block iframes etc. oh it's a mozilla project (mpl and (L)gpl). its fast blah blah.

    http://mozilla.org/products/firefox/

    Leave a comment:


  • KeLviN
    replied
    off/on topic.......
    gMail specificly mentions its mozilla compatability..... but lists Opera as incompatable.....
    odd.....

    been usin' Opera for a short while now and have been very happy with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • mit578
    replied
    look for the index.dat or any .dat files xp home keeps them here
    * C:\Documents and Settings\username\cookies
    * C:Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\History
    * C:Documents and Settings\username\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files

    Leave a comment:


  • moebetta
    replied
    Sector Scan

    Originally posted by stingerbee
    Does anyone know a way of tracing the sites a user has visited through Ineternet Explorer?

    I know that you can view the typed URL's in the registry, but if they clear their history etc this disappears.

    Any ideas?

    To get this data you will need to run a sector scanner or undelete utility and retrieve each and every sector on the drive or try and retrieve deleted files. There are a few on the market that allow you to pull deleted files. File Scavenger will let you undelete up to 64K files for free. A good tool I use is EnCase it can get anything off the drive even partially overwritten areas of the drive. Unfortunately this tool is expensive; $2.500. I used to use a Norton utility to do the sector scan and then use the search utility looking for common text like http://, www. , etc...

    I hope this helps. Lots of work. The best thing to get is IKS. Invisible Keylogger Stealth. So far there are no antivirus or vulnerability scanners out there that can detect it, if installed properly, not the default install; you must mod it; not hard to do. You will need to get to the computer for about 3 minutes without the user knowing. I have used many scanner to try and detect it, i.e. Retna, Qualys, VAM, etc... These tools cost around $35,000 - $90,000. They suck. All you have to do is change the registry key and rename the IKS.dat to some other name and change the iks.sys to the same name and it is completely invisible. It will even capture the ctrl. att delete username and password. The tool is under $100. Very good, but don't let if fall into the wrong hands. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • enCode
    replied
    I say this alot
    It's all personal prefrence
    :D

    Leave a comment:


  • icycold
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by astcell
    Okay I downloaded Mozilla. No difference between that and netscape. Opera has many differences. What is mozilla supposed to do for me? Am I l33t now?

    Try the CRLT-T command you can get tab which is a lot cleaner than IE.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris
    Now, does anyone know of a good media player that I can use in Linux to play .wmvs?

    Just in case anyone was curious about this. Both gxine and mplayer can play .wmvs you just have to install the win32 codecs that you can download from the mplayer site. It's very easy and solves the .wmv problem that I was having.

    Once I R'd TFM I was in good shape.

    Leave a comment:


  • Webster
    replied
    Speaking of I.E. there is a new vuln. Didn't want to make a thread just for the link so thought I'd post it in here.

    http://www.zapthedingbat.com/security/ex02/vun1.htm

    Causes' I.E. to crash, not that you would need any help doing so :\

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris
    replied
    I have been using Galeon for the past four months or say as my primary browser and like it very much. It is Mozilla based (Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.4) Gecko/20030915 Galeon/1.3.9). Same issues that I have run into in the past with Mozilla, making sure the plugins are all there and in the right place, occasional incompatibility with sites designed specifically for IE or later versions of Netscape (<--that one is rare but I have had it a couple of times). Overall, I like it.

    There is no mail client built in like there is for Mozilla. Not a big deal because you can still use Mozilla (or Netscape) mail, but those both call their respective browsers if you click a link in an email message.

    Now, does anyone know of a good media player that I can use in Linux to play .wmvs?

    Leave a comment:


  • astcell
    replied
    I guess it's like women. What you like depends on what you want. I have them all installed, and each has it's plusses and minusses.

    Leave a comment:


  • skroo
    replied
    Originally posted by astcell
    Okay I downloaded Mozilla. No difference between that and netscape.
    That's the point. I can use things like Ciscoworks under Mozilla since they were designed to work under Netscape, but not Opera. Also, because it is Netscape-based, there's a better chance that under casual browsing you won't run into redering oddities or 'this site doesn't support your browser' messages. Tabbed browsing is also nice (particularly if you need to run multiple instances of a single toolset), as is the built-in popup blocker.

    One other nice thing: I can run Mozilla relatively comfortably (note I say relatively) on a P133. Opera and Netscape don't play nicely on that kind of hardware. Plus, Mozilla's free if you feel like tweaking it, and hasn't suffered historically from the same number of security issues Opera has.

    Opera has many differences. What is mozilla supposed to do for me? Am I l33t now?
    If you need a high degree of compatibility, go for Mozilla. Otherwise, stick with Opera if you like it. Ultimately, it comes down to what you want to use it for and whether or not you like it.

    Leave a comment:

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