Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Slack v. 10

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Slack v. 10

    Just a heads up to all those who use slack that 10.0 is out:

    Official Announcement: http://www.slackware.com/announce/10.0.php

    Another big hand for Patrick!

  • #2
    Originally posted by 0versight
    I subscribe, I wonder when Im going to get it. Hopefully Tomorrow or Saturday.
    For anyone not on subscription (I make an annual donation), the bitorrents are working pretty well. Went to bed at 11.30 last night, had both install CDs at 8am this morning. As much as I hate to say it, the torrents are actually a big improvement over the old distribution method for the ISOs - yeah, they may take longer, but at least you can actually *get* them close to release.

    Comment


    • #3
      The torrent is working fairly well for me, there are a list of mirrors avail. but not many seemed to work.
      here are the ones that did work however:
      D1
      D2
      Where's the dedication?

      Comment


      • #4
        This sounds good. I'm going to download the torrents ASAP. I'm excited about PCMCIA support and the OpenSSL and OpenSSH support. Anyone know if there is video card support for newer nVidia cards with this new release? Will the ZipSlack have to be on a Zip disk so it can be written too after the ZipSlack has been saved to it or could it be placed on a CD-R?
        The penguin is watching.
        "The DefCon forums dont reward knowledge, but punish iggnorance." -Noid

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TwinVega
          The torrent is working fairly well for me, there are a list of mirrors avail. but not many seemed to work.
          Oh, and one thing... Since there's no longer any such thing as an 'official' Slackware ISO distribution site, be sure to check that the md5sums of what you download match the ones available at ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackwar...ware-10.0-iso/ .

          (Note: there are no ISO images available from that second link, just the md5sums.)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by skroo
            Oh, and one thing... Since there's no longer any such thing as an 'official' Slackware ISO distribution site, be sure to check that the md5sums of what you download match the ones available at ftp://ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackwar...ware-10.0-iso/ .

            (Note: there are no ISO images available from that second link, just the md5sums.)
            I downloaded last night via bit torrnet both CD's, had all of it in 45 mins ;)

            52mbit dedicated fibre line straight into my apartment rocks ;) god i love tokyo.
            Livin it up in the digital metropolis known as Tokyo.
            Tokyo's 2600 web page: www.tokyo2600.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 0versight
              Is that a special deal or is that standard.
              My connection? Nothing standard at all. I pay total combined fees per month of around 55 US for UNLIMITED bandwidth of 52mega bits per second fibre line connection.

              they call it FTTH, fibre to the home, but has a marketing term of BFlets, broadband fibre somthing somthing.
              Livin it up in the digital metropolis known as Tokyo.
              Tokyo's 2600 web page: www.tokyo2600.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Dented-Halo
                .. they call it FTTH, fibre to the home, but has a marketing term of BFlets, broadband fibre somthing somthing.

                NEW Highspeed Internet! from {comcast|adelphia|verizon|etc} now up to 55 times faster than that crappy ppp thing you had 6 years ago! I think this translates well to the other thread on how much US cell technology sucks.

                As a sidenote.. I read over the changes to slackware and didn't see anything overly impressive that I'm not already doing... so maybe I'll avoid the hype and wait for the next rev (notoriously the more earth shattering release)
                Last edited by converge; June 25, 2004, 09:35.
                if it gets me nowhere, I'll go there proud; and I'm gonna go there free.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My gawd, the downloads coming off the ftp sites are horribly slow...In fact, most of the download sites were down when I checked...Obviously the best option is to use Bittorrents...
                  I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Didn't take me long to get a copy and get it installed on my laptop, running very nicely so far.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EeeekPenguins
                      Anyone know if there is video card support for newer nVidia cards with this new release?
                      You should be able to use the binary nVida drivers.
                      perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I upgraded three boxes from 9.1 to 10 yesterday. Two of the three went exceedingly smooth. The third (my laptop) ran into one problem.

                        For folks with Intel 810 based sound cards (like many Dell laptops have) the ALSA 1.05 packages will give you problems. It's because the rc.hotplug script attempts to start the modem. To fix it, just add snd-intel8x0m to /etc/hotplug/blacklist and everything should work.

                        Seems like Gnome 2.6 starts even slower than 2.4 did (and I wasn't sure that was possible).

                        If you have installed libdvdcss, libdvdnav, and libdvdread to view DVDs, you'll need to reinstall them. I haven't done so yet (using my old versions) so I can't say off the top of my head if you'll need to DL new versions or not. More on that later.

                        Unless you install the optional 2.6 series kernel, your modules should be good if you have maintained patch level (in other words if you were running the 2.4.26 kernel before upgrading). I did not have to remcompile any modules and still had my support for both my Aironet 352 and my Orinoco cards. Haven't tested a Prism2 card yet but don't anticipate any issues.

                        Several browser bugs appear to have been fixed with Mozilla 1.7 particularly when viewing 'enhanced' sites.

                        Gnome 2.6 seems to use less RAM than 2.4.

                        A few things to note. Xwindows no longer uses the XF86Config file. It is now in /etc/X11/xorg.conf. I moved my XF86Config to xorg.conf and haven't had issues, however that could be the reason Gnome is so slow. I am going to generate a new xorg.conf today and see if that addresses the issue.

                        Lots of shit is now in rc scripts in /etc/rc.d that didn't use to be there. For instance there is now an rc.wireless.conf that replaces /etc/pcmcia/wireless.opts and calls rc.wireless to start your WLAN. It's the same format though and easy to set up.

                        There are several new groups added to /etc/group (audio, video, cdrom for example). I added my users to the audio group although I am not 100% sure that was necessary. I did it while troubleshooting my ALSA issues. I'll remove myself from the group later and see if sound still works. Also, I will try adding myself to the video and cdrom groups to see if that addresses the problems with playing DVDs. I'll report back on all of that shit later.

                        There are several differences between 9.1 and 10. I am not 100% sure if I like all of them yet. Mainly because I have only been using 10 for about 8 hours now. I am also going to to a fresh install of 10 on another box later today and see what the differences are between the fresh install and the upgrade. In my experience a clean install has been more stable than an upgrade.
                        perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chris
                          I upgraded three boxes from 9.1 to 10 yesterday. Two of the three went exceedingly smooth. The third (my laptop) ran into one problem.
                          I'm having problems on every 2.4.26-based machine I haven't hand-rolled a 2.6 kernel on: udev fails to recognise /dev post-upgrade, and I only wind up with basic (read hda, ttys, etc.) devices. So far my workaround has been to roll back to 2.4.26.

                          No idea why this is only happening when installing from the packages in testing.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by skroo
                            I'm having problems on every 2.4.26-based machine I haven't hand-rolled a 2.6 kernel on: udev fails to recognise /dev post-upgrade, and I only wind up with basic (read hda, ttys, etc.) devices. So far my workaround has been to roll back to 2.4.26.

                            No idea why this is only happening when installing from the packages in testing.
                            I haven't rolled out any 2.6 kernel boxes yet. I generally start with the bare.i or bareacpi.i stock kernels as a base (assuming IDE drives) and then roll my own from there and haven't had any problems with the 2.4.2x kernels.

                            I haven't met anyone that has had a smooth transition to 2.6 (any distro, not just slack) and am exceedingly hesitant to put a 2.6 on any of my production machines. I may try it on a box at home, but haven't decided for sure yet.
                            perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chris
                              I haven't rolled out any 2.6 kernel boxes yet. I generally start with the bare.i or bareacpi.i stock kernels as a base (assuming IDE drives) and then roll my own from there and haven't had any problems with the 2.4.2x kernels.
                              This is usually how I pretty much do it, too. 2.4 has been pretty good to me from about 2.4.9 up, but I have some P4-era hardware where it would be advantageous (hardware support, etc.) to be using the 2.6-series kernels.

                              I haven't met anyone that has had a smooth transition to 2.6 (any distro, not just slack) and am exceedingly hesitant to put a 2.6 on any of my production machines. I may try it on a box at home, but haven't decided for sure yet.
                              Well, so far I've been running 2.6.3 - 2.6.7 on my workstation, which was a Slack 9.1 base install that I hand-rolled the 2.6-series kernels over. For some reason that box had no udev issues, but the two that I did as packages (from Slack 9.1 and Slack 10) sure do. Granted, I know this isn't a Slack issue, and by no means am I blaming the Slackware team for this - they do an outstanding job, but it seems like they're being handed less and less coherent core software to do it with.

                              This is so bloody frustrating - udev was a major change to, well, the structure of Linux itself, and the general attitude behind it seemed to be, 'damn the torpedoes, we're doing this anyway because it'll be good for you'. Quite frankly, I've been unhappy with the way the kernel's been going for some time now and am seriously considering moving back over to fBSD as a result.
                              Last edited by skroo; July 3, 2004, 11:39.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X