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  • ttickzz
    replied
    Originally posted by blauman
    or you may hafto explain some complex homework to a really hot female... ;)
    haha cool i loved that one..... i am a middle aged female myself.

    Leave a comment:


  • blauman
    replied
    Originally posted by ttickzz
    I hope you do :( I know my English is far from perfect, but I wasn't aware it was that bad :(
    Your English seems better than mine anihow hehehe :)

    I got BS on Electronics Engineering, minor in CS, and yes, math is vital, not just because is requiered to complete your courses, but also, because, it is applied always... for me computers are the tool to get to the other side with an efficient solution. Yet help me to visualize posibilities of deviation from original target while I am getting close to my intended solution. besides that, in just a few years some of us maybe working with a different kind of computers, where our favorite laptop will be processing teraflops, and we will hafto do more mental "Shor algoritms" if we want to keep up... this means we must create a new math, just for us.
    So, anyhow... get all the math you can, you will put them to use. Even in surviving 101 if you hafto... after all, if you are a visitor in a desert, or in a frozed continent, it helps to be quite of an artist in Thermodinamics, or if you have to tactically fight your way through hell, it may help you up to know how to use the information around you, ie stimate distant, or wind speed maybe stimating the miliradians in your normal angle of sigth, and how will this take any effect on your chances... or perhaps you may really need to break encryption... how will you proceed, and if the time may be a factor for you... or you may hafto explain some complex homework to a really hot female... ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • ttickzz
    replied
    Originally posted by LosT
    Chemistry is just quantum physics >:)

    Maybe you should have choosed Engrish instead....teasing.

    LosT
    I hope you do :( I know my English is far from perfect, but I wasn't aware it was that bad :(

    Leave a comment:


  • LosT
    replied
    Originally posted by ttickzz
    Chemistry can be cool up to a certain point. I regret i choosed it - with just a bachelor I have had no more challenge than being a high school teacher

    Chemistry is just quantum physics >:)

    Maybe you should have choosed Engrish instead....teasing.

    LosT

    Leave a comment:


  • lil_freak
    replied
    Originally posted by ttickzz
    No I meant Nanotechnology.....
    Nanotechnology, the mass consumption of brain cells to test your math and mole skills.

    / big grin...y moles =1.20 M x 0.400 L = 0.480 moles
    Last edited by lil_freak; December 17, 2004, 12:14. Reason: had to correct spelling

    Leave a comment:


  • ttickzz
    replied
    No I meant Nanotechnology, and if anyone has any experience with that here.
    It is a field where you can combine Chemistry/biochemistry and computerscience.

    Chemistry can be cool up to a certain point. I regret i choosed it - with just a bachelor I have had no more challenge than being a high school teacher

    Leave a comment:


  • pr0zac0x2a
    replied
    Originally posted by ttickzz
    Sounds excellent - reason enough to continue the hard way even I sometimes feel mathematics make me throw up.
    Plans and reasons for doing a new education , is to be complete independent and able to leave the freaky country I am living in (Norway).
    Is it easy to get free-lance jobs to when you are having a master in security related stuff ?
    I have also been thinking of Nanotechnology, since I have a bachelor in chemistry/biochemistry from earlier. Any of you who are into that ?
    I've always found chemistry to be a pretty cool subject myself and at this point wish I hadn't spent my first two years of college slacking off and having sex with drunk girls. Ok I only regret the first part. But I would have enjoyed trying to get a chemistry minor, if only because its so damn cool. Then again I would have also enjoyed getting a math minor (which I may still do, as was said above, math minors are pretty easy to get for computer students), english minor, physics minor etc etc. Having a great education can be a good way to get into a job, but you need to balance it with people skills. Spend some time trying to get internships and the like before you take your jump out of the cozy womb that is college. Need references for the resume.

    -zac

    Leave a comment:


  • ttickzz
    replied
    Originally posted by LosT
    The mathematics of my degree has always gotten me the job over the CS only guys.

    LosT
    Sounds excellent - reason enough to continue the hard way even I sometimes feel mathematics make me throw up.
    Plans and reasons for doing a new education , is to be complete independent and able to leave the freaky country I am living in (Norway).
    Is it easy to get free-lance jobs to when you are having a master in security related stuff ?
    I have also been thinking of Nanotechnology, since I have a bachelor in chemistry/biochemistry from earlier. Any of you who are into that ?

    Leave a comment:


  • LosT
    replied
    The mathematics of my degree has always gotten me the job over the CS only guys.

    LosT

    Leave a comment:


  • binaryking
    replied
    Well depends what you goal is.
    If it is to get a job at a company as programmer, then yes there is too much math.
    But if you are to research and develop new technology, you need to know all the math you can learn.

    The thing about CS is that all they do is make you think and teach you how you can think and pay attention to small details and solve problems. Learning the new technology is up to you.

    What I really suggest, if you can you manage your time to do so, is to take one computer class of your choice (or buy the book and learn it by yourself) besides your MS school work. Perhaps you can take that class at local community college or private schools or as I said you can learn it yourself.

    Trust me, in field of CS, there are many good programmers and IT dudes, but not that many of them are really strong in math and those are the jobs that are always open.

    Leave a comment:


  • jade7
    replied
    eduacational

    talking of education, would you like to know more on maths and other stuff from all over the world.. check this http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/edu_mat_lit You ll Be amazed at the stats... kool!!

    Leave a comment:


  • ttickzz
    replied
    As Cotman stated, most BS do require taking up to Calculus II plus more and it does depend on where you go to college and what your major focal point is.

    I have calculus from many, years ago, and strange enough, here is Calculus not a claim for a mastergraduation. But there are a lot of discrete mathematics and statistics you need to go through + something called "Mathematics-informatics", and of course algorithms. Calculus is only obligatoric when you choose electronics beside.
    The discrete is the worst, but I do certainly see the point, and feel that it does something with my way of thinking.

    Leave a comment:


  • lil_freak
    replied
    Originally posted by d3ad1ysp0rk
    That's calculus II? I'm finishing doing that half way through my junior year in high school.
    Granted, it is AP Calc, but if that's all we need for a CS degree, thats rather.. meh.
    Yup, that's part of what they cover in Calculus II, however it's only a refresher in which they cover for a week and then move on. I do remember do a lot of First Order Differential Equations, Parametric Equations, and Multiple Intergration in Calc. II, we also covered other sub-topics but the list might be long so I'll refrain from posting them.


    Now is that a minimum? Or the average level most grads get to?
    As Cotman stated, most BS do require taking up to Calculus II plus more and it does depend on where you go to college and what your major focal point is.

    Now as far as Trade or Tech. Colleges go, you would have to ask someone who's more inclined to knowing what they require.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by d3ad1ysp0rk
    Now is that a minimum? Or the average level most grads get to?
    Many 4 year degrees for BS in CS require at least "calc 2" (college semester) and at least 1 or more upper division math course.
    BA is CS is often easier on people with respect to math courses and may not even require any Calculus. (Bad path if you plan to go PhD or MS.)
    Some trade schools offering "Bachelors Degrees in CS" are offering something more like a BA than a BS.

    Leave a comment:


  • d3ad1ysp0rk
    replied
    Originally posted by lil_freak
    Ahh, good old Calculus II, Limits at Infinity were my favorite.
    I also liked Derivatives and Tangent Lines, but then again I'm odd.

    I would say take the math classes it would be in your best interest, as others have stated above. Besides, math is one of those fundamental elements that if passed up may be regretted later on.
    That's calculus II? I'm finishing doing that half way through my junior year in high school.
    Granted, it is AP Calc, but if that's all we need for a CS degree, thats rather.. meh.

    Now is that a minimum? Or the average level most grads get to?

    Leave a comment:

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