Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Going Accross my router

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Going Accross my router

    Hi guys! I have 2 broadband connexions, one at my home and one at my shop.

    The one at my shop hosts my website.

    I'm using DNS2GO because I have a dynamic IP address. When my W2K Server fails or looses contact with the IP redirecting server I loose the mean to connect to my Server (using Terminal Server).

    What I do is use Superscan and scan a serie of IP addresses for a particular port (I use 8084 for my Webpage since my ISP block port 80) and find where my shop is connected. Then I use TS to re-start my DNS2GO client and all is OK.

    My question is about having a peak accross my shop's router.

    How can I PING past my shop router to "see" if my Server is even on-line?

    Pinging could very well not be the good word for this. You know what I mean. I want to see what is connect past my shop router. I sometimes have industrial machinery whit static IP addresse connect on that intranet and it does not always work well. Sometime I have to drive to the shop to see if its even connected.

    Whitout getting remotly on my shop Server, is there a way to see if say 192.168.1.100 is there? inside?

    My routers are simple Linksys.

    tanks.

  • #2
    To ping your internal address, you would have to first connect to your remote router, then from there ping the internal address you're looking for. I dont know if you could make it simpler than that. Luckily with the Linksys routers, you can hack the firmware and get things like SSH running on them.

    I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by 1oo1
      Whitout getting remotly on my shop Server, is there a way to see if say 192.168.1.100 is there? inside?
      As you say, you are willing to use something that provides the results of ping but not be tied to ping itself. All recent LinkSys routers/NAT boxes I have used lately support port forwarding/redirection. If you can add an entry in your shop's router to portforward to the host you want to ping.

      Then, you could alter your firewall (read: "network filtering") rules on your windows 2000 box to alter how that port is filtered. Next, run a scan on this port of your LinkSys when the W2k box is not available. Examine the TCP results from the scanner. Connect up the W2k box, and see the results when you scan. What you are trying to do is get different results in a scan of that forwarded port to a non-existent service when the W2K box is up vs. when it is not. Then, you have something like a ping, that is not a ping, and have not exposed any services un-necessarily.

      Have you considered setting up a script on your computers inside your shop to perform a traceroute or other check to see when your IP address changes, then send an e-mail message to an online e-mail account (like yahoo) with the new IP address when the IP address does change? If a box in your network performs the mail delivery itself, then extended header information in the received e-mail message should show the IP address of the exposed Internet neds (your real IP address) in the e-mail header. :-)

      This would allow you to use a server-push with polling instead of your client-pull.

      I am full of crappy ideas. Leme know if you want more. ;-)
      Last edited by TheCotMan; January 9, 2005, 21:25. Reason: grammar, spelling, punctuation

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TheCotMan
        Have you considered setting up a script on your computers inside your shop to perform a traceroute or other check to see when your IP address changes, then send an e-mail message to an online e-mail account (like yahoo) with the new IP address when the IP address does change?

        I was thinking that when I was reading his original post. Or you know, just goto the website ;)

        LosT

        Comment


        • #5
          I've been playing (actually its my job) with industrial process automation for the last 20 years. I'm a system integrator. I make things talk to each others. Wether they like it or not :) ...

          Not long ago I was ask to crack a password protected system. After a few hours of work I succeded and realized that the more I know the more I understand that I don't know much.

          Hence my journey into the world of hackers. For all I know I was a born hacker. I just never hacked anything with BITs or ring tones.

          I go with the philosophy of "If it ain't broken, break it!".

          This router and IP system stuff, I never really understood. Of course I dealt with it. Seting up automated email clients and Webpages and FTP servers in my industrial systems but this stuff is mostly kids games.

          Now I want to start with basics. To understand IP and TCP I must defeat them.

          I am not a newby and at the same time I will always be one.

          Tancks for the hints on how to proceed. It opens more questions and I will be back after I have digested (read understood) it.

          As for scripting. Gosh! I make some C and VB apps for some clients but that don't make me a thrue programmer. I will give it a shot.

          As for runnig a shell on my router... that is way out of my league .... for the momment anyway. Give me a few undreds years and I should be up to speed :)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LosT
            I was thinking that when I was reading his original post. Or you know, just goto the website ;)
            This would be a good idea, but since he is running Windows 2000, I did not want to assume he was using a web server other than IIS. (Just because IIS is not running anymore does not mean the box is down. (Beavis impression: Heh-heh heh-heh hrm.. Um. Yeah! Like this is cool and stuff... Whoah!) [Just so you understand, this "Beavis" is about W2K/IIS not your post :-) ]

            Of course using a non-standard port makes automated worm infection less likely, but security by obscurity....
            Last edited by TheCotMan; January 10, 2005, 11:56. Reason: Added direction

            Comment

            Working...
            X