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Linux Networking Help. Command help.

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  • Abby_Normal
    replied
    Originally posted by V8N3T
    Hey again yall, ive been googling the commands and ive found a couple website thats have the ABC's of Unix/Linux commands. But I was looking for a better site, more along the lines of a Guide. Im not trying to do anything hard, but for a new beginer in Linux its not that easy starting out. I have both the User guide book and the Administrative guide book. Neither give an example of how to 'Initialize' a network. I spent 3 hours last night trying to figure this out but in return only found out things I wasent aware of. "Not that im complaining, cause I still learned a few things". But Im running Linux Suse 9.0 Pro, running level 3. I figured if im gonna learn linux I wanna learn it the right way, with nothing but commands. So, I do appricate any help yall. Thanks a bunch. 'Sorry if this post is way newblar'
    This site, http://linux-newbie.sunsite.dk/ helped me out alot when I was just getting started. Also, there are lots of great "howtos" online that are very helpful, much better than man files. Tucows.com has a big collection, or just google for howto and your topic.

    Hope that helps. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • noid
    replied
    Originally posted by Data Hunter
    Check out Linux server hacks by O'REILLY. Its got shit on networking to.
    Wow. Thanks for the informative and timely contribution to the forums. You are on your last legs here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Data Hunter
    replied
    Books

    Check out Linux server hacks by O'REILLY. Its got shit on networking to.

    Leave a comment:


  • noid
    replied
    Ya, but this guy is trying to do it the right way. He wants to learn whats under the hood. Too many people start out with *BSD/Linux/UNIX and go straight to the GUI tools and never learn the fundamentals. Webmin is great for admining boxen, but you should learn what its doing first, so when you get on that box that doesnt have it, you're not fucked. Once you find yourself saying 'man, I wish there was an easy way for me to maintain these 3 DNS boxes without having to go into each one to manually edit zone files', then you're ready for the GUI tool. I see a lot of linux people get used to the conviences that Linux comes with then get stuck console on a Solaris box and ask 'how do I edit files' to be told 'use VI' and having to say 'I dont know vi'. You should be framiliar with the underlying fundimentals of UNIX so you can use any UNIX system, then you'll appriciate the perks more. I think thats what this dood is looking for.

    V8N3T - Go hit your local bookstore and get O'Reily's UNIX quick reference guide. It's cheap and looks almost like a small bound pamphlet, it will cover all the basic commands and its handy to bring with you. I also highly recommend the VI, Perl, and Sed/Awk quick reference guides as well.

    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/perlpr4/index.html
    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/vipr/index.html
    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/sedawkrepr/index.html
    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/esapr/index.html


    The regex book is good for later when you want to start understanding the complex and sometimes confusing syntax of regex.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Voltage Spike
    On the other hand, text editors don't verify the validity of a file or warn about potentially dangerous configurations. While I use text files, I believe that a good GUI tool (hopefully with a plain-text config file) can always be the better option.
    Such an advanced tool would be nice, but the level of complexity in samba and sendmail and maybe even spache with ssl would make construction of a tool that could notify you of those configurations that are potentially dangerous or less secure would be difficult.

    Its the job of the qualified admin to know what is dangerous and less secure and make an informed decision.

    Consider the case of netatalk and choice of plaintext, randnum and rand2num for password authentication... there are tradeoffs in security for each choice, and which one to use will depend on where you are more willing to gain security for loss of other security elsewhere.

    When people start to think they can rely on a tool to notify them of problems, you see the same kind of problem that exists when people at a company hear there is a "firewall" and then choose simple passwords.

    Would I use a tool that checks config files for problems? Yes, as a tool to help double-check, but not to replace intelligent analysis.

    Leave a comment:


  • Voltage Spike
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCotMan
    Edits to config files with text editors is much more portable in working with other *NIX systems, and permits more control to advanced service features.

    Webmin and GUI tools are crutches that can help people to walk on their own, but if people continue to stay with crutches, they won't be as fast as those who can run without them.
    On the other hand, text editors don't verify the validity of a file or warn about potentially dangerous configurations. While I use text files, I believe that a good GUI tool (hopefully with a plain-text config file) can always be the better option.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by oz0ne
    I have found webmin to be helpful ...
    Webmin and Distro-specific GUI tools have similar problems:
    * Use of them can be mutually exclusive to manually editing config files: manual change may be lost, or confuse the GUI tools/webmin.
    * Some advanced features available in services are not configurable from the GUI tools/webmin.

    As a stop-gap measure to give you an initial working setup, and/or seeing how changes impact services, may be good excuses, but understanding a service and options for that service should be the ultimate goal.

    Edits to config files with text editors is much more portable in working with other *NIX systems, and permits more control to advanced service features.

    Webmin and GUI tools are crutches that can help people to walk on their own, but if people continue to stay with crutches, they won't be as fast as those who can run without them.
    Last edited by TheCotMan; March 23, 2005, 13:19. Reason: grammar

    Leave a comment:


  • oz0ne
    replied
    Learning linux configs

    I have found webmin to be helpful in learning the configuration of some of the more esoteric services.
    I would use webmin to configure the service, and then go back and look at the config file to see what was changed.
    You can get webmin from www.webmin.com

    Leave a comment:


  • V8N3T
    replied
    thank yall very much. That helped alot, I was just needing some Refrence meterial of sum sort. All these links really help. I do appricate it. But and what I ment by learning the right way is; Id rather teach myself first hand how to operate linux. I will teach myself all of linux. Get the know how first....then develop certin skills in certin areas. But thanks again yall, i got some reading 2 do. l8tr.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by V8N3T
    But Im running Linux Suse 9.0 Pro, running level 3. I figured if im gonna learn linux I wanna learn it the right way, with nothing but commands.

    An older book on TCP/IP, not specific to SuSE
    When looking for commands that you do not know about, try "man -k [subject]" at your prompt.
    $ man -k network | wc -l
    says there are 91 pages with the word "network" as part of their description.
    $ man -k network
    to see them.

    This means I likely have 91 man pages (or man to info pages) on applications, libraries, and config files that have to do with the network settings or networking on this box.

    Also, check out apropos (man apropos) instead of man -k for almost identical results, but more options for specifying what to search for.

    Next, if you want to do something in Linux, there is a good chance that someone or some people has/have written a HOWTO or MINI-HOWTO and stored it online.
    http://www.tldp.org/ is a nice place to visit for Linux-specific items.

    Last, "the right way" to learn? :-)
    Is there a right way?
    There are formalized ways for learning your way around (courses online, in person, or with tutors, etc.) but "right" and "wrong" are value judgements.
    There is learning from books (which can be very fast since you learn as much as you want of what you want as you need it, as fast as you are able instead of waiting for slow people in classes to catch up with you.
    There is trial and error. (Not very effective when trying to guess commands. ;-)
    Many ways to learn, but difficult to say which way is the single "right way" to learn.
    What do you mean by, "right way"?

    Leave a comment:


  • murakami
    replied
    no shame in using Yast

    You probably want ifconfig, for parameters of any command use man; e.g.

    > man ifconfig

    Leave a comment:


  • GodMinusOne
    replied
    Originally posted by V8N3T
    Hey again yall, ive been googling the commands and ive found a couple website thats have the ABC's of Unix/Linux commands. But I was looking for a better site, more along the lines of a Guide. Im not trying to do anything hard, but for a new beginer in Linux its not that easy starting out. I have both the User guide book and the Administrative guide book. Neither give an example of how to 'Initialize' a network. I spent 3 hours last night trying to figure this out but in return only found out things I wasent aware of. "Not that im complaining, cause I still learned a few things". But Im running Linux Suse 9.0 Pro, running level 3. I figured if im gonna learn linux I wanna learn it the right way, with nothing but commands. So, I do appricate any help yall. Thanks a bunch. 'Sorry if this post is way newblar'
    Linkage:

    http://www.sloppycode.net/nix/

    http://www.rain.org/~mkummel/unix.html

    http://bhami.com/rosetta.html

    I have a bunch more links bookmarked on one of my boxen from when the last time someone asked this question. If/When I find them, I'll be sure to post them here.

    Leave a comment:


  • V8N3T
    started a topic Linux Networking Help. Command help.

    Linux Networking Help. Command help.

    Hey again yall, ive been googling the commands and ive found a couple website thats have the ABC's of Unix/Linux commands. But I was looking for a better site, more along the lines of a Guide. Im not trying to do anything hard, but for a new beginer in Linux its not that easy starting out. I have both the User guide book and the Administrative guide book. Neither give an example of how to 'Initialize' a network. I spent 3 hours last night trying to figure this out but in return only found out things I wasent aware of. "Not that im complaining, cause I still learned a few things". But Im running Linux Suse 9.0 Pro, running level 3. I figured if im gonna learn linux I wanna learn it the right way, with nothing but commands. So, I do appricate any help yall. Thanks a bunch. 'Sorry if this post is way newblar'
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