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Juno for Linux?

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  • dementeddemon
    replied
    thank you for all of your help, mostly thank you cotman, becuase i am on dialup everything is slow as shit, but later tonight i will try using alien to convert it, if it works i will let you all know, so that people will know in the future, thanks everybody.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Nimby
    and yet, I download slackware packages that are tgz ... .tar.gz is 'normal' tar / gunzipping ....

    this also might be a case of "YMMV" ... but I degress ...
    :-)

    I think .tgz is a naming convention that was used to satisfy standards of ISO-9660 and 8-dot-3 filename restrictions (or *.-dot-3) from a certain command-line "operating system" and still convey a sense that the file was a gzipped tarball.

    Slackware was one of the earlierst Linux distros that was really popular. When it came out, limitations on filenames allowed on servers, simple CD-ROM, and temporary storage of files on DOS systems before installing made using ".tgz" a good idea at the time. (It was conveinient. :-)

    Dependencies? Conditionals? Ordering? Package revisions and upgrade directives? Post-install procedures? In the early days, these were not part of "packages" and only a few were initially supported by the "package expander/installer. The only need for these early "packages" was to dump files in specific locations on the system.

    When Debian 1.3 came out with dependencies for packages, I jumped ship with Slackware-- back then, dependencies were such a cool idea, that it seemed the way of the future.

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  • Nimby
    replied
    Originally posted by hackajar
    no no no!!!

    .tgz != slackware

    .tgz == "tarball" (gzip'ed tar archive file)

    I'd hate for you to be saying that noise on the street, people have been jumped for less!

    and yet, I download slackware packages that are tgz ... .tar.gz is 'normal' tar / gunzipping ....

    this also might be a case of "YMMV" ... but I degress ...

    Leave a comment:


  • hackajar
    replied
    Originally posted by Nimby
    with my exp with alien, it would be a good bet to convert to .tgz (slackware, I think)
    no no no!!!

    .tgz != slackware

    .tgz == "tarball" (gzip'ed tar archive file)

    I'd hate for you to be saying that noise on the street, people have been jumped for less!

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Nimby
    with my exp with alien, it would be a good bet to convert to .tgz (slackware, I think) .. and then gunzip / tar xvf it and try to compile it manually. going to .rpm from a .deb has only worked once for me ... heh
    Because this is a commercial package and they make it so complicated to acquire it if you are not a member of juno, it is doubtful they include source. It probably runs as a service as root, has a GUI that must run as root, and has been built against libs in Lindows that don't exist in default installs of other Linux distros, but can be added.

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  • Nimby
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCotMan
    .deb suggests debian format and I seem to recall that Lindows used or could use apt-get/etc to get files.. There are various package conversion tools that have limitied levels of success in converting debian <-> slackware <-> RedHat. one, for example is alien.
    with my exp with alien, it would be a good bet to convert to .tgz (slackware, I think) .. and then gunzip / tar xvf it and try to compile it manually. going to .rpm from a .deb has only worked once for me ... heh

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by dementeddemon
    the file extension is .deb , redhat wont run the file so i was wondering if there was some kind of program that i could get and install on redhat so that i can run it?
    .deb suggests debian format and I seem to recall that Lindows used or could use apt-get/etc to get files.. There are various package conversion tools that have limitied levels of success in converting debian <-> slackware <-> RedHat. one, for example is alien.

    Choosing to use an installer not supported by your ISP after converting a packaged installer will probably mean that you won't get support from them.

    Strong suggestion: join a local linux users' group or start a new one.
    Last edited by TheCotMan; April 7, 2005, 20:59.

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  • dementeddemon
    replied
    the file extension is .deb , redhat wont run the file so i was wondering if there was some kind of program that i could get and install on redhat so that i can run it?

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    Originally posted by klepto
    Juno was my first ISP, but I highly doubt they have software for linux? Do you know what the extension is? Most likely .rpm
    They claim support for Lindows (Limited Linux distro that has things run as root) and this is how they have claimed they support linux.

    This means it is possible for those who are willing to put forward the effort to see it work in other distros of Linux.

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  • klepto
    replied
    Juno was my first ISP, but I highly doubt they have software for linux? Do you know what the extension is? Most likely .rpm

    Leave a comment:


  • dementeddemon
    started a topic Juno for Linux?

    Juno for Linux?

    I have recently moved from warrensburg to a small town called lathrop, MO. All they have up here for isp's is dial up, and i was forced to go with juno, becuase of the price compared to the local isp, it works fine on windows 2000 pro, but i cant get the linux version to install, when i try to open the aplication i get and error that says there is no application or program to execute this file or something similar to that, does anyone have any ideas on how to get it to work, or can any one help me please? I am running redhat 9.0 visual interface and redhat text
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