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What type of locks should I expect at the contest?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by che
    Speaking of, does anyone have a good cutaway of a lock with those types? I would love to be able to pick at one where I could see what I am doing to learn the proper technique.
    www.lockpickshop.com

    They sell a few different models with spool pins for both left and right handers.

    "All five stations are pinned with spool drivers instead of the standard top pins, creating a pick resistant cylinder. "


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    • #17
      Originally posted by Voltage Spike
      Perhaps this is the reason you received praise from TheCotMan, no?
      hmm, good point.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by che
        I would love to be able to pick at one where I could see what I am doing to learn the proper technique.
        Looks like Kai helped you out with an image.

        Theory:
        The pins with serated edges work on the principle of "generating false positives" for the person who is picking and difficulty for the raker.

        Each seration causes the picker to feel a "click" like what might be felt if the pins had just met the sheer/shear* line, and cause the picker to apply a little more tension to rotate to the next pin. However, once the pin has started to bind, it is often stuck unless the picker resets the plug to a neutral position.

        Raking has a similar effect, but more pins get stuck in a bound position.

        Spools work on a similar technique to cause binding where the picker thinks they have a sheer/shear line but really do not.

        A technique that is supposed to help the picker, in theory, if the serated edges or spools do not exist on either to top or bottom pins, it to "start" each pin in the reverse position.
        If the top pin has the edges, and the bottom one does not, push the pin to max height, and slowly let it drop while looking/feeling for that pin position's sheer/shear point.
        If the reverse is the case, then start from the bottom and push up.
        If serated edges edist on both the top and bottom (and middle if master) then this technique does not help much.

        Interlocking pins are quite different. In addition to having to be pushed to the sheer/shear line, the pins must be rotated to a specific angle. The cuts on the keys used to operate such locks do not [always] have cuts orthogonal to the plane of the key as it lays flat [like conventional pin tumbler locks]. These cuts can cross the key at an "angle" (hence the name, "angular key cut".)

        The bottom pins in these interlocking pins are not rounded but flatened. (Not like a bullet, but more like a wide car bumper.) This allows the bottom pin to rotate to the groove in the key and allow the interlocking pins to be positioned to separate.

        HTH. :-)

        *sheer/shear - I've seen it in print both ways, and both can make sense. A "cut" line vs. a steep angle. I don't know which was first used, or which is correct, or if only one is correct.
        Last edited by TheCotMan; July 13, 2005, 15:29. Reason: grammar/omitted word/readability

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        • #19
          Originally posted by che
          Speaking of, does anyone have a good cutaway of a lock with those types? I would love to be able to pick at one where I could see what I am doing to learn the proper technique.

          I might be able to snag a few cut-aways at the Locksport International meeting on Saturday from Varjeal.

          I think I might be able to bring a wieser.

          Easiest way to learn about dealing with security pins is to just go out and buy and American 1105 (or similar model) padlock, disassemble it and set it up with 1-2 pins. The one I have has a number of spool and serated pins (including 2 serrated spools, evil! ) and I'm up to dealing with 2 serrated and 2 spools (started at 1 pin and got the feel. You start to feel a false set and a real set quite easily that way. Serrated pins, with a light touch can be lifted past the serrations (clicking from serration, to serration), to the real shear line.

          Here's an evil pick resistance idea: Take a lock with serrated driver pins and run a 1/32" or so tap down the pin chamber and thread the inside walls :) The pin would have to be lifted perfectly straight and moved laterally at exactly the shear line to open.
          Never drink anything larger than your head!





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          • #20
            Originally posted by TheCotMan
            Each seration causes the picker to feel a "click" like what might be felt if the pins had just met the sheer/shear* line, and cause the picker to apply a little more tension to rotate to the next pin. However, once the pin has started to bind, it is often stuck unless the picker resets the plug to a neutral position.
            described very well by cotman, render, and others. starting here is where my presentation slides deal with security pins. the diagrams there illustrate in further detail what people are talking about. (see how mushroom pins don't set properly, and how spool and serrated pins could easily fool the picker with the sensation of a click even when the shear line isn't met?)
            "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
            - Trent Reznor

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