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  • Voltage Spike
    replied
    Originally posted by converge
    It looks like they took cygwin and are trying to make money off of it to windows users ... did I miss something?
    It didn't appear to be Cygwin applications, but the applications they offer provided the same functionality as Cygwin.

    In other words, nothing to see here.

    Leave a comment:


  • converge
    replied
    It looks like they took cygwin and are trying to make money off of it to windows users ... did I miss something?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ridirich
    replied
    Did you ever even click the link? Seriously. Do you know what the program does?

    It is a linux emulator. Instead of having the linux gui, you have the windows gui and can run linux programs.

    Furthermore what the hell was the point of bringing back an old post when you were just going to post mumblejumble anyway? Did you see the last post's date? October. It is now December.

    Leave a comment:


  • cantormath
    replied
    My 2 cents:
    I think their time would have been better spent writting the programs for linux/unix. I dont think anyone is going to realize the benefits of linux/unix this way. If you know how to use *nix, just use *nix. If one could unevolve, this is how ::grin::

    microsoft says so..... :-)
    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Murphy/index.php?p=459

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCotMan
    replied
    I do not see much use for an application that allows local execution of Linux software with an X11 Server running in windows*. Many of the people I know, use Linux as their primary OS and then install something like VMWare with Windows onto the host Linux OS, or the other way around (Linux on a Windows host.)

    As for cross-development of applications for Linux and Windows, GTK is one tool that has been used.

    As for X11 stuff...

    I've used X11 tunneling with ssh support (from an old ssh application for Mac OS 9 and earier, from putty ssh for windows, and a few other tools.)

    For windows, a simple, and featureless application for X11 Serving for windows is MI/X. It is technically crippleware that works for a limited time.

    I've used a few others, but this one was pretty cheap and did what I needed at the time.

    X11 tunneling (raw) can saturate small pipes quite easily, and any kind of animation, movement or transition of contrast (flashing) can really get slow and choppy. Generally, X11 stuff is best done over a LAN, or a connection that is at least 384/384kbps.

    As an alternative, many people have looked to using things like RealVNC or a compressed variation to VNC for modems.

    There have been security issues with X11 tunneling/forwarding even when using ssh, if you are sharing the shell as a multi-user system.

    [Added:]
    *In the top paragraph, I am refering to local running of X11 apps in windows to an X11 server in windows, not remote execution of X11 on *NIX systems with display on a windows X11 server.
    Last edited by TheCotMan; October 14, 2005, 17:56. Reason: More specific with "*" and note at bottom

    Leave a comment:


  • pr0zac0x2a
    replied
    Originally posted by Ridirich
    Anyone seen this?It is interesting though...if you can run a windows emulation on unix/linux systems, why not run unix/linux on a windows based systems?
    I think in a large part this has to do with the fact that there aren't a lot of programs that run on *nix that don't run on Windows that people who use Windows would like to use.

    The majority of useful *nix programs (Mozilla, VLC, Open Office, GAIM, mplayer) are already distributed in Windows format. Same for non-free and enterprise level software. 99% of programs that don't come in a Windows binary format are open source so getting them to run on Windows is usually possible, if not slightly difficult. Those that are difficult probably wouldn't be worth the effort, or don't have a large enough user base to justify them running on Windows anyway. In short, though its definately possible to emulate *nix on Windows, theres just not a large enough amount of people who need it or want it to convince someone to do the coding for an emulator. Heck the people who'd have the knowledge to do that most likely have a *nix box around anyway.

    This is in comparison to the other side of the coin, where there is a large amount of software (games for instance) which are Windows only, with no way to run them on a *nix box without emulation.

    As far as that program goes, I think it would be great for situations where you need to run a Linux GUI program from a Windows machine. For instance, doing configuration and setup in SuSE or other graphically intensive distributions. I'd be surprised to hear about it selling well though. Also, I think its already possible to do X forwarding to a Windows machine with free software (cygwin), however I've never tried it myself.

    -zac

    Leave a comment:


  • Ridirich
    started a topic WinAxE

    WinAxE

    Anyone seen this?

    Opinions, concerns?

    I, personally don't like the fact I gotta pay for it, but hell, everyone has to make money somehow.

    It is interesting though...if you can run a windows emulation on unix/linux systems, why not run unix/linux on a windows based systems?
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