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  • Need help from someone who has a barcode scanner

    I have a barcode that I need to see the data contained in it, is there a software method to do this or can I scan the image to someone and you scan it with your scanner?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Veovis
    I have a barcode that I need to see the data contained in it, is there a software method to do this or can I scan the image to someone and you scan it with your scanner?
    Newer barcodes need fairly high resolution scans for proper software decoding.
    If it is a simple barcode standard like codabar, you can try visiting your public library. Many hardware-based barcode scanners in use at such locations are actually keyboard wedges, and will translate the barcode into a signal through to the keyboard port as though they were typed by hand from the keyboard itself.

    You can take such a scanner, and start notepad, wordpad, emacs, vi, whatever, and then scan the item to have the content dumped into the "foregrounded" application. (Wedge-type scanners are really great, since they do not generally need any extra software-- just a compatablekeyboard port like XT,AT,PS/2. There may even be scanners for USB, but in such cases, extra driver software may be needed.)

    Even if your bar code is not an older/simple codabar, many modern barcode scanners actually support reading of many, many barcode standards, and are shipped with support for them enabled. (It takes work to disable support for all of the different "standards" and as a result, it is possible that your code can be read.)

    It was not a trivial find with google, which is why I'm taking the time to answer this, but I did find this:
    http://www.visionshape.com/visionX.htm
    It claims to support OCR, and Barcode scanning from images, as well as extraction from PDF, and other formats. It also seems to be "Crippleware" freeware, meaning, its "freeware" trial version will work, or partly work, and for a limited time.

    Also, update your e-mail address on the forums. Thanks!

    Comment


    • #3
      like is there a way to tell from the thickness and # of bars
      How exactly do you think the scanners do it? (the answer to your question is yes).

      http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...des+work&meta= contains the information you require.
      Twigman

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      • #4
        It is not actually a scanner, but with a little "intelligent analysis", you can guess what it says here: http://isnoop.net/barcoder/
        Hope it's the right type.

        This site also seems to provide some good information (google -> barcode translator)
        http://www.barcodehq.com/primer.html

        Hope you'll find what you're looking for.

        -GBHis

        [By the way, can anyone tell me what would happen, if I connect my lan-cable to my com-port? Would I be able to set up a network with myself? I have no ideas (this migth be a stupid question.)]

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GBHis
          [By the way, can anyone tell me what would happen, if I connect my lan-cable to my com-port? Would I be able to set up a network with myself? I have no ideas (this migth be a stupid question.)]
          Assuming "com poert" is "old-style 9/25 pin serial" and you are looking to try to connect it to an ethernet/10/100/1000 Base T network, in a best case scenario, nothing. In a worst case scenario, damage to the port on the "other end" and less likely, damage to your serial port.

          Serial uses different signalling and voltage from Ethernet. In addition, RS232 serial can use 9/25 db connections, but other serial standards (with higher voltage) can also use the same db9/25 connectors.

          With windows 95 (and later), and many *NIX systems, you can use a "null modem serial connector" to connect two computers' serial ports, and then use PPP/SLIP to network the machines together. (A similar solution can be found with parallel ports and an "Interlink" cable.)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TheCotMan
            Assuming "com poert" is "old-style 9/25 pin serial" in a best case scenario, nothing. In a worst case scenario, damage to the port on the "other end" and less likely, damage to your serial port.
            Option numberwhatever: set up a virtual interface on the existing NIC, give it an IP address, and route traffic across it.

            (A similar solution can be found with parallel ports and an "Interlink" cable.)
            You just brought back really bad memories of having to use INTERLNK and INTERSVR under DOS to copy files between machines. *shudder*

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by skroo
              You just brought back really bad memories of having to use INTERLNK and INTERSVR under DOS to copy files between machines. *shudder*
              Yeah, I used these back in the DOS days, and did not like them much-- they were faster than serial, but still too slow.

              With Windows 95 (back in, um, 1995) we found that use of an interlink cable to another windows box allowed for slow "network file copy" between two machines. I convinced the users to spend $10 each, and buy NE2000 clone cards, and necessary cables to connect the machines-- they were much happier with this.

              The most amusing setup was use of a terminals server (ethernet/serial) to allow for file transfer between Apple, PC, Linux boxen and terminal access to browse the internet from an Apple ][c (terminal software-> terminal server -> remote shell-> lynx.)

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              • #8
                Yes, depending on the type of barcode, you can read it directly...with some effort...

                LosT

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                • #9
                  Barcodes

                  How did you find the barcode? Where is it printed? Why do you need to read it?
                  Do you know how old it is? That would make it a lot easier to find....

                  Sorry for doing all this off-topic posts, really, but it isn't worth a thread of it's own..
                  Originally posted by TheCotMan
                  Assuming "com poert" is "old-style 9/25 pin serial" and you are looking to try to connect it to an ethernet/10/100/1000 Base T network, in a best case scenario, nothing. In a worst case scenario, damage to the port on the "other end" and less likely, damage to your serial port.

                  Serial uses different signalling and voltage from Ethernet. In addition, RS232 serial can use 9/25 db connections, but other serial standards (with higher voltage) can also use the same db9/25 connectors.

                  With windows 95 (and later), and many *NIX systems, you can use a "null modem serial connector" to connect two computers' serial ports, and then use PPP/SLIP to network the machines together. (A similar solution can be found with parallel ports and an "Interlink" cable.)
                  Yeah, I guessed they had different "protocols". I just wondered wether something on the motherboard would blow up, or what would happen.
                  "Com-port" here is the 25 pin jack. I never got to use one of these (started too late)... But my old box had one.

                  Another stupid question (yeah, I'm full of these):
                  How can you transfer data faster with an 8 pin "ethernet/lan cable" [The one you mentioned before], than with a wire with 25 pins? Seems strange.

                  And another one: [Windows XP/2000/?Vista?]
                  Alternate Data Streams.
                  These are VERY interesting. What I so far have heard is, that they are a feature for compatibility with an old apple file format, that can be exploited under the NTFS to hide files. I tried some simple experiments, but I can't understand what happens when I do them.
                  First one:
                  cmd-prompt> type test1.txt > ihidethings.txt:test2.txt
                  1 file(s) copied.
                  * Where do test2.txt get saved? I think that I've read that it was appended to
                  * the "file information sector"? If so, where do the file information for test2.txt get * saved?
                  cmd-prompt> notepad ihidethings.txt:test2.txt
                  * This works. test2.txt opens in notepad with the contents of the original
                  * test1.txt-file.
                  cmd-prompt> type test1.txt > ihidethings.txt:test3
                  1 file(s) copied.
                  * Succes, but when I type
                  cmd-prompt> notepad ihidethings.txt:test3
                  * Notepad returns: Cannot find file: ihidethings.txt:test3.txt
                  * Notice: It appends the .txt extension to the test3-file. Annoying and strange?
                  * Let's run Frank Heyne(www.heysoft.de)'s freeware program, LADS, to see if
                  * is really there?
                  cmd-prompt> lads
                  {This output is "sliced".}
                  13 C:\Documents and Settings\Me\Desktop\Experiments\ihidethings.txt:te st3
                  * How do I open test3 in Notepad?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GBHis
                    How can you transfer data faster with an 8 pin "ethernet/lan cable" [The one you mentioned before], than with a wire with 25 pins? Seems strange.
                    DB9 and DB25 (the two common connector types for old-fashioned "serial) have specific pinouts for various conductors. You can perform a google search to find these, but at a minimum, there are 4 conductors required (Rx pairs and Tx pairs) even though some people have claimed to get away with 3 with double-use of a Ground. ( I never got that to work.) Such serial had no "hardware flow control" but instead relied upon "software flow control" (both are good google phrases for more research.) Terminals Servers frequently used 6 conductors to allow for some hardware flow control.

                    Google for: db9 db25, pinout "software flow control" and "hardware flow control"

                    To understand signalling, and physical layer issues, google for "bit" "voltage" "signal high" and "signal low"

                    Similar searches can be applied to 10/100/1000BaseT "Ethernet" by substituting "RJ45" for "DB9" or DB25"

                    And another one: [Windows XP/2000/?Vista?]
                    Alternate Data Streams.
                    Grifter gave a talk about this at DC12.

                    The first published "hack" I saw discussed about this was for Windows NT 4.0, where someone suggested websites in duality over the same files. (IIS supported ADS too.)


                    they are a feature for compatibility with an old apple file format,
                    To understand this, keyword google search for "data fork" and "resource fork" with "HFS" and MasOS 7-9 (Documentation for 6 and earlier is probably sparse.)

                    cmd-prompt> type test1.txt > ihidethings.txt:test2.txt
                    1 file(s) copied.
                    * Where do test2.txt get saved? I think that I've read that it was appended to
                    ...
                    I bet this can be answered with the help of google. You got your "first one is free" but you really need to use the powers of google to understand the answers to your questions. (This has been covered in many online papers: how it works, why it works, what happens, and methods to replicate it.

                    These new questions you have been posting seem to show a lack of research on your part. Please check with google to answer these kinds of questions; it has more free time than many of our members.

                    Thanks

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