Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Data storage for the truly paranoid...

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Data storage for the truly paranoid...

    While thinking of what I was bringing to defcon in terms of computers & software, I decided on bringing backups of my software on CD, but I wasn't sure how I wanted to store my pgp keys.

    A couple ideas came to mind, such as on a smart card, with a USB reader/writer (just enough space for a key I believe, and fits nicely in a wallet) or a USB Keychain hard-drive..

    I was wondering if anyone has used either of these techs much, or has had better ideas for this kind of thing in the past.

    (One low tech option that's already been suggested was to just carry a sheet of paper in my wallet, but that's just not nifty enough for me)
    a pc-0x90 by any other name is a nummish..
    Bigger 1:23

  • #2
    Storage

    One of my favourites was my old Rio PMP300. It only had 32MB of RAM, but that was more than enough for some useful tools, various keys, and a tune or two.

    Somewhere out there (though the name escapes me) is a package that treats the PMP300 as another physical drive, so you can treat as just another part of the filesystem. Windows and Linux version were both available IIRC, and there was even a similar driver for BeOS, though it only worked under R4.5.

    Comment


    • #3
      memory stick

      If you have the money, i find that Sony Memory sticks kick ass! I have 2 128 Mb sticks, a floppy disk adapter, and a usb device, both needed driver wrinting, but is wasn't too hard. And it acts like a mountable filesystem, and best of all they are so small, so they are easy to hide anywhere ( shoe, electrical socket, whatever )

      Comment


      • #4
        I love smart cards/usb tokens/iButtons/etc... :)

        Originally posted by pc-0x90
        I was wondering if anyone has used either of these techs much, or has had better ideas for this kind of thing in the past.
        Smart Cards/ USB Tokens work wonderfully, depending on the size of your key and the size of your smart card you may fit one or two certs on one device. This is also a good method to keep your key private since the device will zeroize when there are 1 too many invalid pin attempts. (These devices usually require some type of middleware to interface with)

        Though if you have a lot of large keys and want to carrry them all, you can use a USB flash drive (they are up to a gig), and are the size of a usb token, (just nowhere near secure)...

        The work around I came up with for a lot of private data was to NTFS format the usb drive, and then load PGPDisk (from the last pgp international version that included it) this way if the usb drive is lost they would still need a passphrase to mount the drive, and use whatever is inside. Of course you could also use EFS/NTFS which would require a cert on the machine to be able to access the PGPDisk file to mount it...

        The cool thing with the flash drives is that most oses support them so all you do is plug-and-pray...

        Some of the newer flash drives are coming out with a simple passphrase to unlock the drive... but I am waiting to get one of those in a week or so... surely the password middleware will be broken in a few minutes... :)

        Comment


        • #5
          Those USB keys are cook but be sure which way your ports face, you may not be able to set the laptop flat and still use it.

          I use SecureID by RSA security, I will login to a VPN with a password that changes every 60 seconds.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by astcell
            Those USB keys are cook but be sure which way your ports face, you may not be able to set the laptop flat and still use it.
            Yeah, most flash drives come with a USB extension cable that can fit in your usb-mini hubs. They are also inexpensive enough to carry a few around or keep in a safe deposit box for 10 years.

            Comment


            • #7
              If you have 4 USB ports, make a RAID out of the drives...I wonder if you can put some of the boot sector on it. The potential is unlimited.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by astcell
                I wonder if you can put some of the boot sector on it.
                In fact the flash drives are bootable, though mostly come limited to booting to a Windows environment. :)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Are the USB devices friendly to Linux?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by astcell
                    Are the USB devices friendly to Linux?
                    Yes they are *nix compatible :)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by blackwave


                      In fact the flash drives are bootable, though mostly come limited to booting to a Windows environment. :)

                      I was able to get BEOS as well as Linux to boot via flash drive, it dose work but it takes a bit of tweaking. I believe I got it to work with Linux by accident not sure. But Blackwave is definitly right in this matter flash drives are really a windows friendly device.
                      There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.

                      - Henry David Thoreau

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by L0nd0
                        But Blackwave is definitly right in this matter flash drives are really a windows friendly device.
                        They are certainly phun to play with, I should be getting the latest model any day now... :)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How about if I use 4 USB ports and install Windows in a RAID across 4 1GB cards, then encrypt the results so that you need all 4 cards to even boot the device....

                          Just when you build a bigger mousetrap, along comes a smarter mouse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by astcell
                            How about if I use 4 USB ports and install Windows in a RAID across 4 1GB cards, then encrypt the results so that you need all 4 cards to even boot the device....
                            You certainly would have the fastest windows on the planet.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'll get the BSOD much faster than anyone else! Flash cards are not good for computer ram because of too many read/writes, the cards do have a limit. I wonder about the 1GB drives through, if they can handle many read/writes, and thus be used as a main PC drive.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X