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  • help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

    hiiii
    i want to be a network security engineer
    how do i start?

  • #2
    Re: Getting started in the security field

    Originally posted by getanshub4u View Post
    hiiii
    i want to be a network security engineer
    how do i start?
    Really, did you just ask that, without providing any additional information?
    "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Getting started in the security field

      i'll be graduating in information technology(B.Tech) two years from now
      i'm really interested in the network security field.
      what certifications should i opt for?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Getting started in the security field

        Originally posted by getanshub4u View Post
        i'll be graduating in information technology(B.Tech) two years from now
        i'm really interested in the network security field.
        what certifications should i opt for?
        Did you read the many links provided in this thread?
        perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Getting started in the security field

          Originally posted by Chris View Post
          Did you read the many links provided in this thread?
          yeah but they are over 2 years old now!!!!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

            Forked to new thread. This is a different topic.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

              Originally posted by TheCotMan View Post
              Forked to new thread. This is a different topic.
              I call troll on this post.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                Originally posted by Pyr0 View Post
                I call troll on this post.
                On the post you're actually quoting or the OP of this thread?

                If it's the former and not the latter, aren't you pretty much taking your life in your hands?
                A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                  Originally posted by streaker69 View Post
                  On the post you're actually quoting or the OP of this thread?

                  If it's the former and not the latter, aren't you pretty much taking your life in your hands?
                  I was saying that I think the person who posted the original question is trolling. If you were actually serious about joining an industry and learning more why wouldn't you take the time the search the forums, visit industry related sites, attend a conference, or study from any of the other endless sources of knowledge that exist on this VERY topic. When I first read this message all I saw was a polite but classic example of the "teach me to hack".

                  I would also like to note the Join date of Mar 2010.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                    Originally posted by streaker69 View Post
                    On the post you're actually quoting or the OP of this thread?

                    If it's the former and not the latter, aren't you pretty much taking your life in your hands?
                    Naw. I've worked with Pyr0 and Russ by email before, and worked with them last year, getting information passed between us about the contests and events that had completed the process with Russ and Pyr0. I would not have taken his reply as about my post, but instead about the top of the thread. :-)

                    As for it being a troll, I was choosing to wait and see after pruning it away from the original thread. I spend more time maintaining that thread than any other thread on these forums.

                    In favor of trolling:
                    * "hiiii" instead of "Hi"
                    * Lack of punctuation as a disconnect with the claim to having a degree in 2 years
                    * Lack of proper capitalization as another disconnect with the claim to getting a degree in 2 years
                    * The questions about certs long after certs were discussed in the original source thread.
                    * "2 year old information is useless" (not a direct quote: interpreted, even though the people that do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.)

                    It probably would have been sent to /dev/null when I found it, but other posters have attempted to treat the question seriously, so I left it in Community Talk to see if it could become productive or useful. Now I am waiting to see what happens, which is probably the same thing the other mods are doing. (Some smart mods ask interesting questions to allow more failure to be exposed, and that might bee happening here. ;-)
                    Last edited by TheCotMan; March 21, 2010, 20:51.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                      You and Pyro needs to get your senses of humor back. I was just kidding.
                      A third party security audit is the IT equivalent of a colonoscopy. It's long, intrusive, very uncomfortable, and when it's done, you'll have seen things you really didn't want to see, and you'll never forget that you've had one.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                        In the interest of, as Cot said, attempting to make this useful, I will treat it seriously.

                        hiiii yourself. I too am attempting to break into the Network Security world, as a career switcher from teaching high school. Here's what I am doing in the process of that. I'll break it down into what I have done, what I am doing currently, and what I plan to do.

                        What I have done -

                        Minor in Computer Science (I was unsure of where I was going at the time, but I liked programming so I picked up the minor)
                        Other Education - I picked up a Certificate of Continuing Studies in Network Security. (To be honest, I'm not even sure how useful this will be, but work picked up about half, and it was useful as a career switching tool since I was switching from teaching to IT work. Helped me remember a lot of stuff)
                        Basic Certifications - A+, Network+, Wireless# (These were all really easy, as I had been building my own computers since HS and screwing around on them, and taken AP compsci in HS, and a couple networking classes in college. Pretty much anyone with basic knowledge of computers can rock through them in a month or three with some review for terminology.)
                        Pertinent Certifications - Security+ (Most people here are pretty down on Certs, and I agree with them for the most part. The certs so far have seemed to be mostly about learning vocab. That being said, I know that the government requires certain certs for certain positions, so that might be a great place to start looking. I work for a contractor so I use the government list as my goal list.)

                        What I am doing-

                        Work Experience - Almost 2 years working for a gov. contractor in IT (I don't know if this is true, but in my own research for getting into the industry, I had read several places that most companies wanted some basic IT experience before moving into network security. So that's my goal here, get some basic experience under my belt.)
                        Conventions - Defcon twice, Shmoocon twice, The Last HOPE. (Going to Defcon on my own dime twice has already gotten me a strong suggestion to submit my resume for an entry level security position. He was very impressed at the effort I was going towards, but the work place was far away from where I had just bought a house *sigh*. Either way, going to cons has definitely allowed me to start meeting with and networking with professionals in the field, and provides a solid, tangible piece of evidence that I am willing to put forth effort in getting a job in this field.)
                        Certifications - My current work is in wireless so I'm working on Certified Wireless Network Administrator and Certified Wireless Security Professional. (Both of these were just added to the army list of required certs for auditing their wireless network, so it seemed like a good idea. Also, my boss LOVES certs, and will pay for as many as I get.)

                        What I am planning to be doing -

                        Education - I'm planning on getting a masters in Network Security. (Unfortunately it will have to be an online masters, as I have a house and a job in a place where there are no local uni's. It will also be a while down the road, as I have one kid and another on the way! Money's a little tight right now.)
                        Certifications - Next one will be CCNA likely, eventually CISSP (We do a little work with Cisco here, and it seems like a decent idea. I'm not sold on it completely at this point, but as I said, my boss is really good about paying for certs and classes so it will be no money out of my pocket, just my time. CISSP is highly desired by HR departments everywhere, so that will be a no brainer when I get the requisite years of experience.)
                        Work Experience - There is a data center close to where I live. When they start posting for jobs I'll be applying there. This job has been useful as a place where I can get started, but there doesn't appear to be any real advancement potential here. A data center probably offers a lot more educational and technical opportunities for me to get closer to where I want to be. Additionally, it would only be like a five minute commute! Hah.

                        And there you have it, my plan for breaking into the Network Security industry in hopefully five years. Actually, this post came at a good time, as I was almost two years into my plan and starting to have self doubts. It was a good exercise to write it all out and get back into feeling it.

                        As always, this is not guaranteed or even necessarily factual information. This is the plan I settled on after researching requirements in the industry, and the types of companies available in my area. YMMV.

                        Mel
                        Last edited by Melesse; March 22, 2010, 07:41. Reason: Additional formatting
                        Secretary

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                          Since i have got 2 yrs left in my graduation,can you suggest me what courses should i undertake?
                          MY HITLIST:
                          1)CCNA
                          2)NETWORK+
                          3)SECURITY+
                          4)CCNA SECURITY
                          5)LINUX+

                          After reading the many links posted here i concluded that microsoft wont be in much use in recent years to come,so having a linux certification would be much helpful(i leave this to all you network experts to guide me out).
                          And i think the comptia A+ certification wouldn't carry much value if i do network+ and/or security+.
                          Have i left out any other important certifications?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                            When i use the word 'certification' i mean the knowledge gained from doing the course and not necessarily getting the certificate itself.From the posts i have read that most companies pay for your certifiation exams,so i'm not exactly interested in the certifications but rather the information/knowledge gained by doing such courses.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: help me: how to become network engineer [was:getting started in security field]

                              Originally posted by getanshub4u View Post
                              After reading the many links posted here i concluded that microsoft wont be in much use in recent years to come,so having a linux certification would be much helpful(i leave this to all you network experts to guide me out).
                              I'm curious what you are basing that comment on? Realize that Microsoft has something like 90% of the desktop market and 60% of the server market.

                              In short, you're going to encounter it just about everywhere. If you don't know how to work it, then you reduce your value to your organization. Someone who knows UNIX, Linux, *and* Windows is going to be a valuable employee.

                              IMHO, if you are interested in becoming a network engineer I'd be focusing your efforts on learning architecture and protocols, save the product/platform specific stuff for down the road (the Cisco certs being an exception to this). If you know how all this stuff works under the hood, you free yourself from being a 'windows engineer' or a 'unix admin' and get to be a networking engineer. Understanding the protocols that drive the network is essential. In addition to your schooling, I'd go with some of those Cisco certs, Networking+, and Security+.

                              One thing to keep in mind though: for the most part certificates only get you past HR. There is a surprisingly large chunk of the IT world that thinks that their cert guarantees them something or that having that cert makes them an expert and thus not beholden to anyone. I, personally, think most of these certs are BS...but what I think isn't nearly as important as what a company you want to work for thinks. If they have decided they won't even talk to a candidate that doesn't have their Networking+ cert..well, that means you need to have it whether its BS or not.

                              I interview people pretty regularly. When I look at their resumes I don't look at their certs, I look at their work history and their educational background. When I see someone who is clearly touting their certs in lieu of experience, I'm less inclined to interview that person. In the event that someone else has made the decision to bring that candidate in for an interview and wants me to meet with them I give them enough rope to hang themselves. Sometimes the candidate says 'ya, I have those so I can get through the HR filter, here's where my real skills are and what I want to do for a living'. Sometimes the candidate says 'The guy at the CISSP testing center said I didn't have to answer any hard questions now that I have this cert, can you just give me the huge salary he said I'd get with this cert?*'. When I have a candidate who does the latter, I go for the throat in the interview.

                              So, get your certs but realize that you should use them to reflect the skills you have, not the skills you are hoping to acquire. Just out of college no one is expecting you to be a kung-fu master of anything, they'll be looking for your desire to develop your career and if you have the aptitude to learn the role. The benefits you'll get from certs at that level wont be the cert itself but that you are showing them that you are serious about a career and that you had the drive to study up and see it through.



                              *paraphrasing, but I've had 2 interviews with folks who basically said this. One didn't get hired. The other got hired but was let go after 3 months because management finally figured out what I had told them after the interview...the guy didn't know jack-shit, he thought his cert was a free pass to big money and prizes.

                              I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

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