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  • What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

    Our capacity to recognize mistakes AND victories through observation of other people and use this knowledge to our advantage demostrates wisdom.

    After attending Defcon (or other conventions) what would you want to pass on to "newbies" (new/beginners) to Defcon or any kind of confereces?

    Let met start with an example:

    Lesson:
    "Do not plan to adhere to a pre-set schedule of events to attend at Defcon. Create a plan of priorities for each hour listing what interests you for every hour of Defcon, BUT allow yourself to drop any plan if other opportunities present themselves."

    Background:
    Maybe you were planning to attend a talk, or watch a contest, but you are having a really awesome conversation with other people, or found yourself learning a new skill, educating others, or invited to go to lunch or for a drink with other people. Maybe the thing you planned to do is not going to be as good as this new opportunity. Allow your plans to change. Restricting yourself to a regiment can be harmful. Some of the best times I have had at Defcon have happened because I set aside something I loosely planned to do in favor of something unexpected, but interesting.
    Having a list of *something* to do every hour of Defcon provides you with something to do, but don't limit yourself to only follow your plans.

    Now it is your turn. There is no requirement to follow this format, and I won't be policing or correcting people that don't follow it, but here is a suggestion:

    1) State your advice first.

    2) Explain the detials of why your advice helped you, or would help others.

    If you don't want to follow that, it is okay with me. :-)

  • #2
    Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

    The below advice took me 14 Defcons and untold other cons to develop. There are no secret techniques, only plain ideas. This advice applies if this is your first Defcon, or your last, if your old or young.

    Defcon is a 96 hour car crash. Defcon is as much a physical experience and a mental one.

    Rest and chill before heading to Defcon. Have you hotel, travel plans everything sorted beforehand. Harden your laptop, your cell phone and your everyday carry. Have your VPN operational before you try to make it work in Vegas. Put an extra $100 in your shoe, don’t ask me why. You’ll know when to use it. Get plenty of rest in the days leading up to Defcon. Take your vitamins and I mean real vitamins not the kind that were taken in the 90s.

    Vegas is basically a vampire. It’s designed to suck everything it can out of you. Onsite, drink plenty of fluids and eat right. The heat, the AC, the drinking of alcohol will dry you out and degrade your performance. Water is a good start, isotonic waters help more. Eat right, in the last couple of years Vegas has learned that people will pay to eat healthy. Eat some veggies.

    Pro-Tip: Look you’re going to drink at Defcon, you’ll probably over indulge. When you check in at the hotel, get yourself five Gatorades. Put them in your hotel room. After a night of drinking, running around and making a fool of yourself, drink one of those isotonic waters. You’ll thank me in the morning.

    Vegas will suck your money too: So be prepared, be mentally prepared to spend money for cabs, food and other bullshit. My best advice is to accept this fact and enjoy.

    Pro-Tip: Vegas has in the last 15 years greatly improved its food offering. There are good to great places to eat in Vegas. There are clones of some of the top restaurants in the world. With kitchen and wait staff trained by the best in the world. We are in the middle of an economic downturn, you can get reservation. You should plan a night out with some friends. 4-6 max. No last minute add-ons. Make reservations. Treat yourself to some truly fine tech talk while enjoy and excellent meal. You deserve it. If you’re feeling indulgent dress up too.

    Parties: Quiet parties are better than big parties: Ok it’s true big parties are fun too. But I will say that the suite party is where it is at. While a couple of big sponsored parties tend to dominate the scene every year and everyone want to go to that party. Find out about the invite only suite parties these smaller, quieter affairs tend to have better amenities, (read booze) but more importantly more interesting people who you can actually hear speaking. You are not the social pariah you might think you are.
    Sleep: I used to be able to Defcon on 8 hours of sleep..for the whole 96 hours. Those days are done. Get your rest, you’ll be more awake when you are up and Defcon will seem less like a dream and more like an actual event.
    Walking: Your going to walk a lot, a whole lot. Wear comfortable shoes. Don’t carry a crap load of stuff. Travel light, move fast.
    Accept Disappointment: You’re not getting into that talk you wanted to see or that party, you missed that epic something or other, your question will not get answered. Sorry it happens, move along now please

    Pro-Tip: Pack as light as you can, and leave space to bring stuff back. If you’re a super swagger bring an empty duffle bag.

    Random Bits of Advice:
    The party you’re at is probably the same as the party your friend’s think they can get you into, minus hang out waiting to get in.
    Corporate parties suck.
    Be excellent to yourself and others.
    Participate: If there is one thing I’ve learned from Defcon it is that the tent is large and everyone is generally welcome.
    Tip everyone, and learn their names. Call then by their names. Generally thank them for their service.
    Get your cabbies card when you fly in. Put it in your wallet. Now you have a cab to call should you need it.
    If you are trying to get something done (say go to X) it’s easier to do in a smaller group. Avoid the vortex.
    Avoid Drama Lamas
    Talk to strangers.
    If the cabbie says “ Are you sure you want me to take your there?” you should consult with him or her. Cabbies know things, you do not.
    Tip your goon early and often.
    The pool isn’t that bad..actually it can be downright refreshing.
    If you're drinking from someone else's glass, it's time to go back to the hotel.
    Gambling is tax for people that can't do math. ( I know some of you are very good at math, though)
    Last edited by Agent X; January 19, 2012, 12:52.
    AMFYOYO

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    • #3
      Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

      While I've loved Defcon every year I've attended, I had a better time last year than ever before due to going with a group of people. In my case, it was my local Defcon group; find out if you have a local group and meet them now, rather than waiting until August. If you're a really social person you can of course meet people at the con pretty easily -- most people are there to have a good time and are very open to meeting people, but there are a lot of introverts at Defcon, too, so you may have to make an effort. Going with a group means always having something to do, particularly in the evenings when there aren't official Defcon events going on, other than crowded parties which just aren't everyone's thing.

      If you like to participate in infosec stuff (i.e. actually get your laptop out and hack rather than just listening and talking), stay at the Rio. Yes, being in the con hotel can be more expensive and means being close to the chaos, which some people don't like, but it also means being able to sit down at open CTF or the wireless village and play, and then when someone asks if you want to go out to the pool or to a party being able to say "sure, be right there" rather than "uh, I have to put my laptop somewhere or go back to my hotel and come back here..." When I've stayed at a different hotel I've had to decide each day if I want to lug around 10 pounds of hardware everywhere, or not have it at all -- staying in the Rio means being able to do both.

      Agent X's feedback is all good, too, though I'd be leery of trusting Vegas cabbies too far (they get kickbacks from businesses.)

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      • #4
        Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

        I always have advice (some good) but I never write them down, so it's often fleeting.

        Best advice lately: Avoid the vortex

        The Vortex theory - Noun, "The Vortex of suck" or "The Vortex" - In any group attempting to perform an action (i.e. Go out to eat, drink, party, talk, strippers, etc ) there is a point at which the number of people in the group hits a critical mass and spawns "the vortex" (as in time/energy vortex, something that sucks up both). This can usually be recocognized as having occured by people saying phrases such as 'let me just do....' or 'I've got a couple friends who....' which inevitably starts a chain reaction of those people needing to goto a hotel room/call one of thier friends/exteded bathroom visit/etc which takes longer than it should and leaves the groups standing around for long periods of time, better sepnd doing the aforementioned activity.

        Counteraction of "The Vortex of suck" is easy - To counter act a newly spawned vortex, one simply needs to invoke it's presence to the group as observation of the phenomenon is usually enough to break it. This usually involves one person arbitrarily recognising that the group has spawned a vortex and pointing it out, then moving to go do the planned action regardless of who may be left behind or whatever actions spawned the vortex. Should a concensus to move on be achieved quickly, the vortex's hold is successfully broken and the action can proceed.

        e.g: Person A: "We were planning on dinner, but we've gotten too big. We are all hungry, therefore I'm invoking the vortex and saying that anyone not here in the next 2 minutes can find thier own way" Group: "You're right, lets go, they can catch up"

        Care should be taken to exercise judgement when invoking 'the vortex' to the group as premature invokation can seem rude or pushy to the group. As well, leaving invocation too late can lead to hunger, missed rides, wasted time and sobriety.
        I find groups of 6 among my friends are the tipping points for most things. Keep in mind this also can apply to the ability to be seated for food/talks and the general quality of conversation when the person you really wanted to talk to is at the other end of 20 people.

        One of the cardinal rules I tell first timers is what I consider the Defcon motto: "Ignorance is corrected, Stupidity is punished". It is perfectly fine to not know something (ignorance). No one is an expert at everything. The trick is to be honest about your knowledge. I have seen people in conversations (been in many myself) where a topic or term is unknown to that person and they say "Sorry, can you explain <foo>" and the other person is more than happy to give a quick crash course in <foo> to bring them up to speed so they can now participate in the rest of the conversation.

        Stupidity (as defined by trying to fake knowledge) however, is punished. The person bullshits that they know everything about <foo> and generally put thier foot in thier mouth and makes themselves look very stupid for doing so. There is always someone smarter than you in the room and they are usually nearby to make you a fool. i.e Spouting off that you know everything about DNS (when you dont) inevitably results in Dan Kaminsky standing right behind you and basically gives you a verbal wedgie.

        Also be aware of who you may be talking to. I once was having a conversation and asked about the 802.11i committee and what the hell they were drinking when they designed it, only to find out I was talking to Al Potter, who happens to have been on that committee. Foot promptly in mouth, but to Al's credit, he understood my position and proceeded to educate me (which culminated in a Shmoocon talk with us drinking onstage with the chairman of the IETF). I have seen people claiming they invented or wrote <foo> while talking to the real author. Not sure they got the blood out of the carpets on that one

        Another piece of advice is to get outside your comfort zone. Some of the best experiences I've had with people is through doing things I am not good/familiar/aquinted at and interacting with other people. Some of the best times I've had are with a half dozen people I just met, hanging out in a hotel room, just talking about things. Ive made some great friends that way too.

        I'm sure I'll have more later.
        Last edited by renderman; January 20, 2012, 02:02.
        Never drink anything larger than your head!





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        • #5
          Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

          Originally posted by Agent X View Post
          Gambling is tax for people that can't do math.
          Stolen. Prepare to live in a signature, elsewhere. Yeah, I realize it may not be original with you. Don't care.

          In addition, folks, he's right. I'm good at math, and while I may occasionally play blackjack, I have an aversion to being photographed, and quit while I'm ahead in any case.

          My own number one advice? Try listening. You never know; you might learn something.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

            i have a few things to say here, but i'll try to keep my comments brief and limited to one bit of advice per post, hopefully

            Dev Tip One - Be as efficient as possible with your time off-site

            If you leave the hotel (and that's a big "if" since there have been many years that i have never left at all and been very happy about that fact) have a very specific plan and don't expect transit to go smoothly. Walking the strip is a process, with highly regulated intersections (you can't just Jaywalk anywhere) and lots of slow-moving crowds of gawkers. Driving or cabs can take way longer than Google Maps would have you believe, unless you take side streets and back roads.

            One of the few really good reasons to leave the hotel is for cheaper, more secluded food options. A great way to recharge is to pick a group of about 6 to 8 friends (that's really the max you should have) and go to one of the places with a hidden Vegas food deal (that i'm keen to mention elsewhere) like the $7.77 steak, shrimp, and potatoes at Mr. Lucky's (the eatery in the Hard Rock) or dine at the Ellis Island which has a similar $7 steak offering. The great thing about these choices is that they're both off-strip which usually means less traffic (and each one is accessed directly down Flamingo, so not much difficulty or traffic. Cab rides are often cheap and quick.

            Things like little errands, however... beer runs, electronics shops, other crap like that... please do your best to get it handled before the con starts. If you're like me, trying to hit stores or anything during DEFCON itself just leads to minutes that feel like hours, ticking by like molasses as you sweat and curse behind the wheel of a car (or worse, the back of a taxi)... all the while irked at the things you're missing back at the con. Either send someone else, or send out a tweet asking if someone else may be going, or just do without because it beats being away from the hotel. If you're new to DEFCON and you leave for more than 60 or perhaps a max of 90 minutes, you're doin' it wrong.

            (NOTE - if you attempt to eat at a restaraunt, even the ones listed above, with a group larger than maybe 8 people... you can sometimes forget about even getting seated in under 45 minutes!)
            Last edited by Deviant Ollam; January 20, 2012, 07:45.
            "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
            - Trent Reznor

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            • #7
              Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

              Dev Tip Two - Shark it Up

              No, i'm not talking about getting into an awesome gang streetfight with the Jets featuring slick choreography. I'm saying that the more you stay still at DEFCON, the better the chance that you'll die (figuratively). I know that some people are really down with getting really deeply immersed in something and sitting at the same table for six hours. And that's cool. Hell, without people who do that the Lockpick Village wouldn't be so full (and some folk might consider that a good thing, heh)

              But yeah, especially if this is your first DEFCON... try to push yourself to get up and see other things, especially if you've been in the same room or the same seat for more than one hour. If you wanna play at the pro league level, adjust that figure down to about a half-hour. Even if you don't have social graces, just make up some excuse like "i'm gonna grab another drink" or "i'm gonna hit the head" and then just wander off. The people with whom you had been sitting will not think it all that odd that you just sort of got swept away into something else. They can always call or text you if hookers and blow show up right after you got out of the jacuzzi.

              Honestly, this same thing goes for the parties... especially when Friday and Saturday nights are in full swing (between 8:00 or 9:00 PM and 1:00 AM) ...almost as cool as being at a great party is the fun of stepping out and heading around to see another awesome party. You can always come back if you wind up someplace lame. (This was a lot more true back at the Riv when there would be like 4 or 5 parties simultaneously in the skyboxes)

              But yeah, unless you've got a hot person on your lap and they're making out with you... keep moving around. Be a shark if you want to take the biggest bite out of DEFCON that you can.
              Last edited by Deviant Ollam; January 20, 2012, 08:35.
              "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
              - Trent Reznor

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                Dev Tip Three - Less Tech is Best Tech

                I'm channeling the spirit of very wise people like HighWiz here... and over time i've totally come to embrace their theories hardcore. Leave your goddamn laptop in your room, assuming you bring it at all. (I still bring mine just to put out fires back home in the event of some tech disaster. I can VPN in and fix routers or servers... but i thankfully haven't had to do that in years and years.)

                If you own a smartphone, bring it (along with an extra battery and the smallest wall charger you can find, that you will keep in your pocket. i find the Kindle adapter to be pretty perfect for even the smallest-pocketed outfits). If you don't own a smartphone, consider finally making the leap if you're up for a new device.

                Get it as locked down as you like (meaning use a Black Berry or have an Android that you have rooted and can make image backups of, etc) so that you can wipe it or restore it after the con if you're especially paranoid. You're fine without the WiFi... just stick with forced-3G or forced-4G even. enable VPN if you wanna be extra nice.

                But for real, if you've never tried travel without your laptop(s) then by all means do that for DEFCON!!
                "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
                - Trent Reznor

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                  Agreed, I leave mine off during con, it's a great break, you don't risk getting owned, and you're (likely) more social.

                  Honestly just pick a place to hang out at (bar, hallway, smoking area, etc). Most groups having conversations there are open to including anyone new, *especially* if you bring beer!

                  Kallahar
                  --- The fuck? Have you ever BEEN to Defcon?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                    Here are a few of the gems that I have picked up:

                    1. Buy a bottle of liquor or a case of beer. Carry around said beer. Share unopened beers with people. Watch the party follow you.
                    2. You are never too fat, hairy, or gross to hop into the pool.. do it. Vegas is hot and pools are awesome.
                    3. Bring extra money to help out with events or surprise expenses.
                    4. I have missed 1 Defcon is the last 5/6 years (memory is fuzzy there). That was the biggest mistake I've made. GET THERE, no matter what it takes.
                    5. Let go of doing everything yourself, people are great and very helpful.
                    6. The best laid plans are abandoned about 20 min into DefCon. You will not do all of the things you plan to do, but having an idea is generally a great idea.
                    7. I've been roped into a sort of schedule of social events. I find that when I deviate from that list.. cool things can happen.
                    8. Try not to hover around 1 or 2 people. Head off on your own and just say hi to random people. They are usually very nice.
                    9. Goons are great people.. treat them with respect, buy them beer/water, and listen to what they say when they say it without question. Your time will improve greatly!
                    10. Don't sweat the small stuff. Things don't always go 100%.. so what.
                    11. Know what you are talking about and who you are talking to before you say anything. Absolute loud mouthed ignorance is not tolerated well.
                    12. DON'T BE AN ASSHAT!
                    13. DON'T BE AN ASSHAT! (so important it had to be said twice)
                    14. The social network you build at con will create lasting friendships that you will have for a long time.
                    15. If she is out of your league and hitting on you hard core.... she is most likely a hooker.
                    Originally posted by Ellen
                    Do I wish we could all be like hexjunkie? Heck yes I do. :) That would rock.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                      Originally posted by hexjunkie View Post
                      1. Buy a bottle of liquor or a case of beer. Carry around said beer. Share unopened beers with people. Watch the party follow you.
                      ProTip: go big.

                      By that i mean, don't just walk up to a bunch of people, plop down an open case of beer, and sort of join the conversation. If you want to really make an awesome first-time introduction, etc... be the conversation or the draw. Create a mini-happening that moves around. Put something together that costs you almost nothing and doesn't cost others at all. Make it a little flashy. Make it participatory. Make drinks involved.

                      Here's an example i'm just pulling out of my ass by looking around our office...

                      Patch Cable Crimping Challenge

                      Get yourself a little red wagon and fill it with ice and beers. Grab all of the old CAT5 that you still have laying around. (Seriously, why do you have it? Every time you go to make a patch cable, you have to look at the tiny print only to see that it's not CAT5e and you have to start over again. Take all that shit out of your office once and for all) Have the cable in pre-cut 3' lengths. Buy a couple bags of RJ45 crimp connectors and get two crimp tools (which you can later return to Home Depot or wherever)

                      Make a sign that says "Ask me how you can win a free beer in under a minute!" Then go around and let friends challenge each other to see who can strip, pair, and crimp RJ45 heads on each end of a 3' section of cable the fastest. Winner gets a free beer.

                      Want extra bonus-y goodness to add to your hacker cred? Build a small plywood structure on the back of your wagon that has four network jacks. Each pair of jacks is for contestants to test their cables... maybe you wire in some LEDs on the sign on this board. Contestants submit their entry by jacking in. If all eight LEDs light up, they are proven to be the winner. And each person gets to go home with a working patch cable, even if they weren't the fastest.

                      Seriously, i just thought of that sitting here and you could build it in one hour, LEDs and all. Cost to the person running it: under $100 easy, even with the beer. And you'll forever be known as "the awesome Patch Cable Crimping Challenge" person. Take this idea. Run with it. Or make your own. But whatever you do, gear it around people getting involved in a way that takes no time and moves around the con.

                      (All ideas like this are totally inspired by and derivative of the OG of roving awesome fun, the 23b Mobile Disco Party Cart)
                      Last edited by Deviant Ollam; January 22, 2012, 09:21.
                      "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
                      - Trent Reznor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                        To add to Deviant's Go Big advice

                        Doing something that no one else has done or doing something bigger is a great ice breaker and inspiration for others. Case in point, my outfits over the last few years. The coat/goggles/mask/cane came out of needing a project to learn electronics. It was certainly a great ice breaker and newbies to old timers loved it and were asking about it and it facilitated some great conversations in the hallways over a couple beers produced from messenger bags. It was also neat to see others taking cues and hacking thier evening wear to add some hacker style.

                        What many people dont know is that I was inspired by a couple in my early Defcon's (7 through about 10) who I have no idea of thier identity but they would always dress up in elaborate costumes for the B&W ball. Thier attempt to 'raise the bar' was inspiring and pushed me to try and raise the bar as well. I would recommend to anyone to have at least one outlandish outfit (hell, Deviant and company dressed up as your friendly neighboorhood TSA agents) and just roll with it. Defcon is the one time of year you dont want to blend into the crowd.
                        Never drink anything larger than your head!





                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                          1) Anybody who has reason to want to go to Defcon will find someone you click with, something to do, and something interesting to learn. It's there, believe it, don't give up, keep looking.

                          2) This place is what is not because of the taking, but the giving. Share your skills. I think I've taught someone to solder every year I've been in the HHV; it's my favorite programming language.

                          3) That guy in the GITS t-shirt may not be just some guy. You never know who you're talking to, who they are, what they know, what they've done. Be open minded and prepared to learn; do not try to be the coolest guy in a black shirt in Vegas -- you aren't.

                          4) It is an opportunity to play masquerade for a couple of days. I have clothes that only come out for Defcon. I hear leather pants are coming back, or maybe I'm just being hopeful...
                          TSA luvs my Uzi.

                          "We shall not cease from exploration. And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started, and know the place for the first time." -T.S. Eliot

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                            Case in point about my previous point of trying new things, I stretched myself and went to the DC shoot. I'm very much not a gun nut, but I went anyways to try something new. Met Firmwarez, handled his firearms (ilterally not figurativly) and met someone I spent a bunch of the weekend hanging out around and getting to know better. I expect that should timing work, he and Shortgrrrl will hang out this year with Grey and I.

                            While he's a gun nute and I'm not, you can still be friends because there's a huge common ground. It's just that someone has to take that stretch outside thier comfort zone to take that step.
                            Never drink anything larger than your head!





                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: What is YOUR advice for people new to Defcon?

                              As a DEFCON first timer in 2011, here are my thoughts on the overwhelming experience...

                              From the DEFCON 101, the 3,2,1 rule
                              -> At least 3 hours sleep a day
                              -> At least 2 meals a day
                              -> At least 1 shower a day

                              In addition to that basic advice...

                              Hydrate, and then hydrate some more.
                              Prepare to deal with the heat outside, it aint no joke out there!
                              Sleep when you get home.
                              Travel light at the conference itself.
                              Make plans for your day, but also expect them to change as the day goes on.
                              Talk to people you wouldnt normaly talk to.
                              Talk to people you would normally talk to.
                              Do the things that you have always had an interest in, but never had the chance.
                              Dont carry your gadets when you walk near a pool.
                              Dont rush around, enjoy the things going on around you as you go from one place to another. You may see or hear something that you REALLY need to take a closer look at.
                              Dont rust the wireless, its a trap!
                              Go to the DEFCON Shoot, especially if you are from a country with restrictive gun laws.
                              Use cash, dont trust the ATMs at the hotel.
                              Goons like beer.
                              The network Goons that I met are slightly more picky about their alcohol

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