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  • desktops

    Originally posted by KeLviN
    i personaly know of 3 people that had gateway celleron laptops where the processor just "burned up".

    although i havn't encountered any problems with their older desktops...
    My brother's computer case came set at 225 insted of the 115 volts setting and no one noticed it and after we put everything in that took hours a few minutes later after we turned it on we smelled somthing that smelled like burning and the processer burned up.

  • #2
    Sounds like user error to me there tough guy.

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    • #3
      yeah since like every power supply i have bought comes with a big sticker or booklet that remind you to check the voltage setting.

      Also it is a wonder that, correct me if i'm wrong, most PC power supplies (read none that I have seen) don't automatically detect and switch for the appropriate voltage. every manufacture's laptop power supply I have seen does this, so does the charger for most cell phones. If this automatic switching can be put into a charger that has a retail price of $30, why can't this be put into pc power supplies that cost $60 to $200+
      </being pissed of at stupid people... for now>

      --simple3

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      • #4
        220V vs. 110V

        Originally posted by simple3
        yeah since like every power supply i have bought comes with a big sticker or booklet that remind you to check the voltage setting.
        Or that years of (presumably) knowing what the correct local voltage is and that it's generally assumed that everyone must use 110, *everywhere*, would make you check what the power supply is set to before you turn it on. Coming from one of those countries with the oddball 220V/50hz power requirements, this is pretty much the first thing you do before you stick the power cord in the machine.

        Also it is a wonder that, correct me if i'm wrong, most PC power supplies (read none that I have seen) don't automatically detect and switch for the appropriate voltage. every manufacture's laptop power supply I have seen does this, so does the charger for most cell phones.
        Correct. However, PC power supplies (tend to) still require manual attention; I assume that the reason for this is that desktop machines tend to stay put in one location as opposed to being dragged from random power source to random power source.

        If this automatic switching can be put into a charger that has a retail price of $30, why can't this be put into pc power supplies that cost $60 to $200+
        </being pissed of at stupid people... for now>
        For the reasons I outlined above. 110-volt countries don't tend to share a physical border with 220-volt countries, so in the interests of keeping prices down, it's probably not worth the extra hassle or expense of including a self-switching supply.

        Oh, and for the record (again, it's that whole 'coming from a 220V-country' thing): I know exactly what happens when you throw a supply to 110 on a 220 circuit, and it ain't a whole hell of a lot. We tried; all that happens is that things don't work. Do it in reverse, though, and Bad Things Happen.
        Last edited by skroo; January 26, 2003, 23:52.

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        • #5
          under-volting will rarely (never) cause a burn up.

          my laptop power suply is auto switching. a great thing to have when i went to europe.
          the fresh prince of 1337

          To learn how to hack; submit your request

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          • #6
            Re: 220V vs. 110V

            Originally posted by skroo
            desktop machines tend to stay put in one location
            Theese people obviously haven't been to a defcon, although I see your point, however I still must point out that this functionality appears to be cheap, how much do you think those chargers actually cost to make?

            How many people here are coming from a country that has 220volt power? are any of you planning on bringing desktop PCs? You guys should start a revolution and force the power supply manufactures to add this option. I will join your cause, but feel I don't have standing to start it(oh yeah I also don't really care that much)

            --simple3

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            • #7
              I took US gear to Europe and toasted a few laser printers because of the voltage switch not being properly set, it's the power supply that usually fries first. Under voltage should not matter unless some other portion of the contruction was incorrect, in which case if you smelled burning, you were much better off having used 110 than 220.

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