DEF CON Forum Site Header Art

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Kali vs. Parrot, or something else?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question: Kali vs. Parrot, or something else?

    What’s your favorite distro to use? I finally tried out Parrot OS and I gotta say, I think it may be replacing Kali for me!

  • #2
    Originally posted by nahberry View Post
    What’s your favorite distro to use? I finally tried out Parrot OS and I gotta say, I think it may be replacing Kali for me!
    What criteria do you use to determine which is better?
    What problems were you trying to solve?
    What made Parrot better for your needs than Kali?
    6: "Who is Number1?"
    2: "You are number6"
    6: "I am not a number!..."

    Comment


    • nahberry
      nahberry commented
      Editing a comment
      A. I never said one was better than the other, I’m just wondering what other people think of the two. Simply starting a conversation. B. Not trying to solve any problems, Kali always performed well. C. I haven’t spent enough time in Parrot to give you a good answer on that. I’m mostly enjoying the more polished KDE and it’s running extremely smooth on a USB drive with persistent storage, so that’s a bonus.

  • #3
    Originally posted by nahberry
    A. I never said one was better than the other, I’m just wondering what other people think of the two. Simply starting a conversation. B. Not trying to solve any problems, Kali always performed well. C. I haven’t spent enough time in Parrot to give you a good answer on that. I’m mostly enjoying the more polished KDE and it’s running extremely smooth on a USB drive with persistent storage, so that’s a bonus.
    Having a favorite implies it is "better for the need you had," which gained status for you to solve that need as a favorite.
    I'm not looking for "an absolute 'best' distro" but instead looking for why it was best for you.
    My question is not a gear-up for any attack on your claim.
    There is little value in arguing over personal preference; it is one of 4 classes of arguments which have no winners.

    There is value in understanding how you came to your selection of a favorite.

    Understanding why people choose to use various tools makes a discussion more interesting and potentially more informative.

    "Smooth function when booted from USB" (when 2 different distro are compared on the same USB Media and same computer) is often correlated with fewer filesystem blocking issues, or optimization of process config to reduce one or more bottlenecks (CPU, Bus, Memory, Disk I/O, etc.) Have you had time to evaluate which ways Parrot has provided this better for you than Kali?

    Have you compared Parrot to Kali with the same USB media and computer, and done any tests like "iotop" and "top" to see if for the same operations (whatever you normally do, like, start a web browser, connect to a web site, browse to a few pages), and time them using "Wall Clock" and evaluate results from "iotop" and "top" to see how they perform? Have you been able to find which kinds of optimization has made the experience better for you? Maybe also compare interrupt counts required for each to get you "logged-in" and then a delta of same counts to complete the same operations.

    So that you don't feel like you are being singled out, please let me provide some replies about my own personal experience for various OS Distro and how various OS become favorite with limited scopes, based on need:

    MS-DOS/FreeDOS : Still useful for older hardware when needing to upgrade firmware/hardware on systems that still support or require non-UEFI based "legacy" boot. (Modern hardware has been moving to "signed firmware" and BIOS and vendors of hardware provide their own UEFI mini-OS for just the purpose of upgrading "BIOS" / firmware and validating it is vendor signed before installing, and report when the installed firmware is not valid. As time moves forward, MS-DOS/FreeDOS will not be a favorite.

    Ages ago, Slackware was a nice choice of distro because it was much easier than trying to build "Linux from Scratch" until system became self-hosting with kernel and compiler, and at the time, Slackware did all this work for users, and there were not any other distros to choose from.

    Ages ago, but not as many, Debian 1.3 was better than Slackwave for me because of "automatic dependency computation" : I didn't have to track down which libraries were needed to make a Slackware installed package work, and then install them. With Debian 1.3, I could choose a package, and it would show me what other packages would be needed, and then let me choose to satisfy the deps, or not. It would also provide suggested extra packages, which were not required but might help to use the originally selected package.

    RedHat became a "favorite" in Linux land, for a time, because some third party services tested their services primarily on RedHat or RedHat Enterprise systems, and if you wanted the best chance to have performance and reliability out-of-the-box when using those services, then choosing RedHat was the safer choice. Examples included getting Oracle DB service for Linux. Much of their online support and documentation also included assumption you were running from RedHat or RedHat Enterprise.

    OpenSuSE became a "favorite" choice for a brief time to support a single suite of packaged services and libraries to run software from one vendor because that was all they supported. If I did not need to run the proprietary suite of software, I don't think OpenSuSE would have ever been on my favorite list.

    Ubuntu was a more commercial-style distro than Debian, at the cost of imposing more requirements on non-free software, but functionally approaching something more like what would be expected in a desktop machine: DeCSS/DVD playback, support for non-free fonts, support for non-free video drivers to support 3d rendering in "modern" graphics cards, non-free printer drivers, and more. However, as more time passes, Ubuntu leaks more and more personal data to more an more third parties, unless you remove default services and applications. Most of these leakages are framed in arguments to make the system more convenient, but if privacy is your thing, Ubuntu does not appear to have that as a priority ahead of convenience and easy to use with more features than others.

    "Linux from Scratch" became a favorite to use at one job, because that is what they used for their suite of applications, and the only way to test and use their software and get platform updates with similar results was to use their in-house Linux distro.

    OpenBSD became a brief favorite, because it was a cheap and easy way to NetBoot (BOOTP, TFTP, NFS) a really old Sun 3/60 box.

    FreeBSD became a favorite because one colocation provide of VPS only offered Widows or FreeBSD, and between these two, FreeBSD was a much better fit for my needs: (Web Server, Mail Server, remote support with limited virtual hardware.)

    Ubuntu (live CD) and Kali (USB or live CD) became options to help with diagnostics of *nix systems that would not boot, or had other issues. Between these, Kali took less time to boot, used less memory, had fewer services running to the background "to try to be 'helpful'" and had more tools I wanted to use available pre-installed with smaller amounts of media space required. As a result, Kali was a favorite most of the time between these two. Really, the only advantage the "Ubuntu Live CD" option had was to repair an MBR, or help with repairing a filetsystem which had a complex configuration that could not be repaired from the provided initrd.

    (I've used many different "Live CD" or "USB" distros, but not on a regular basis. I mostly run full desktop distros in VM on my laptop as needed.)

    Tails ( https://tails.boum.org/index.en.html ) is a pretty nice, simple to use USB thumb-drive boot-able OS with more privacy features than many other OS. It is not as feature rich as a tool for exploring or repairing other computer systems, but it has many privacy based tools pre-installed, and attempts to make enabling privacy features a default on boot. For ease of use, and privacy centric focus, it is my favorite USB Bootable thumbdrive for that space.

    As you use Parrot, would you let us know what you like about it more than others, for your needs and what those needs are? What features have caused you to abandon one OS and move over to a new OS?

    (I'm trying to be welcoming here, and encourage people to contribute their ideas and reasons for decisions. I hope these above examples makes you feel more comfortable sharing your experiences with us on your use of Parrot.)

    Thanks!
    Last edited by number6; April 14, 2020, 00:11.
    6: "Who is Number1?"
    2: "You are number6"
    6: "I am not a number!..."

    Comment


    • nahberry
      nahberry commented
      Editing a comment
      While I appreciate the time you put into this, my goal isn’t to write a college essay on different linux distros or conduct tests between them to reach a “best distro.” Maybe view the question as a way to simply see what other people enjoy using as a daily driver (sounds to me like you don’t have one). If that’s too simple of a conversation to have on here then I apologize and I’ll happily go to a different forum. (:

  • #4
    Originally posted by nahberry
    While I appreciate the time you put into this, my goal isn’t to write a college essay on different linux distros or conduct tests between them to reach a “best distro.” Maybe view the question as a way to simply see what other people enjoy using as a daily driver (sounds to me like you don’t have one). If that’s too simple of a conversation to have on here then I apologize and I’ll happily go to a different forum. (:
    I understand your goal. Good luck!
    6: "Who is Number1?"
    2: "You are number6"
    6: "I am not a number!..."

    Comment


    • #5
      I personally have. Always prefered parrot. For me. Its the esthetics and just feels overall more natural/intuitive.

      Comment

      Working...
      X