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Linux Mandrake 9.2 with Xp Professional Dual Boot

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  • Linux Mandrake 9.2 with Xp Professional Dual Boot

    I have Windows Xp Professional on my laptop and want to put Mandrake 9.2 on it as well. After having so much trouble with red hat linux and Xp pro, I heard alot of good things about Mandrak such as support for Wifi and a larger community supporting it. Anyone have any suggestions as to what I should do when I install it? I tried many other forums and took their advice and it still wont work.

  • #2
    my advice? don't put mandrake on anything.
    "Those who would willingly trade essential liberty for temporary security are deserving of neither." --Benjamin Franklin

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jesse
      my advice? don't put mandrake on anything.
      Why not? I have used it for a while, and have yet to have a problem with it. It finds most hardware quite well, and can be locked down as good as redhat or many of the others. I have systems running it and XP with dual boot, and one running XP and Mandrake 9.2 at the same time via VMWare with no issues.
      True, it is sorta "Linux with training wheels", but for folks new to linux (like liljoker771) or lazy (like myself), it does the job quite well.
      Happiness is a belt-fed weapon.

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      • #4
        I am not new to Linux, I have been using redhat as my primary Os for awhile and like it quite a bit. But after Redhat changing their policies only allowing support for corporations, I wanted to try Mandrake, expecially with the built in support for Wifi cards. When I installed redhat it wouldnt install on the partitions I made, I used partition magic and made all the partitions I was told to on other forums and websites. it wouldnt work so I said screw it and over wrote Xp with Redhat. I just want to have bot operating systems on my computer with a dual boot. Does mandrake also use the Lilo boot loader overwriting the MBR?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by che
          and can be locked down as good as redhat
          heh...

          Originally posted by liljoker771
          I am not new to Linux, I have been using redhat as my primary Os for awhile and like it quite a bit.
          If you can't figure out how to dual boot XP and Mandrake then yes, whether you want to admit it or not, you are a newbie.

          Originally posted by liljoker771
          I used partition magic and made all the partitions I was told to on other forums and websites. it wouldnt work so I said screw it and over wrote Xp with Redhat. I just want to have bot operating systems on my computer with a dual boot.
          Use fdisk or cfdisk to create your partitions. Fuck Partition Magic.

          Originally posted by liljoker771
          Does mandrake also use the Lilo boot loader overwriting the MBR?
          Not 100% on Mandrake, but it uses either Lilo or Grub (or choice of either). You don't have to overwrite the MBR, although that is the method I prefer. You can put your boot loader on a floppy.
          perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chris
            jesus jesus what's it all about
            trying to clout these little ingrates into shape
            when i was their age all the lights went out
            there was no time to whine and mope about
            PINK FLOYD! Yeah!
            45 5F E1 04 22 CA 29 C4 93 3F 95 05 2B 79 2A B0
            45 5F E1 04 22 CA 29 C4 93 3F 95 05 2B 79 2A B1
            [ redacted ]

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            • #7
              Has anyone used BING and its counterpart bootnow, never got around to using it and was wondering how it was since the subject was dual booting.
              If there is a Church of WiFi, then this is it's !

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chris
                Use fdisk or cfdisk to create your partitions. Fuck Partition Magic.
                I can't echo this sentiment enough. An ex-employer of mine used to force us to use Partition Magic (they were involved with its development) for multibooting systems that used non-Windows bootloaders.

                It's a piece of shit. When it breaks (which is more common than you might think), it breaks BIG. Its own recovery & repair tools eat ass for actually fixing a problem, and it can cause certain antivirus packages to go batshit.

                Avoid. Avoidavoidavoidavoidavoid.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skroo
                  I can't echo this sentiment enough. An ex-employer of mine used to force us to use Partition Magic (they were involved with its development) for multibooting systems that used non-Windows bootloaders.

                  It's a piece of shit. When it breaks (which is more common than you might think), it breaks BIG. Its own recovery & repair tools eat ass for actually fixing a problem, and it can cause certain antivirus packages to go batshit.

                  Avoid. Avoidavoidavoidavoidavoid.
                  Agreed, i have had real good success with the Ranish partition manager in the past. As for Partition Magic ...yeah it can break things pretty bad.


                  As for setting up you actual patition space, create your partitions leaving the first partition on the drive for Windows XP/2K and install Windows first. Then after installation has completed boot to the linux distro CD of your choice (mandrake, redhat, whatever ...i prefer Slackware) and setup your linux partitions in whatever layout you want (hdx2=/boot, hdx3=SWAP, hdx4=/ seems to be a pretty popular arragement) and install under that arrangement. Just for the sake of saving settings i would setup a /home partition in there somewhere as well just in case you want to keep that partition in tact in case you board the distro merry-go-round.

                  Hope this helps, please speak up if you need more help.
                  The essential feature of complex behavior is the ability to perform transitions between different states ... Complexity is concerned with systems in which evolution, and hence history plays or has played an important role in the observed behavior.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mindstorm
                    As for setting up you actual patition space, create your partitions leaving the first partition on the drive for Windows XP/2K and install Windows first.
                    Yep. There is a way around being forced to use the first partition for Windows, though. This can be useful if you have an OS (Linux, for the sake of our discussion) already installed there that you want to keep, and enough free space left on the drive to install a Windows OS.

                    Prior to starting, you'll need a Windows Bootdisk that either has FAT32-capable format tools available, or will allow access to media housing them; also have bootable Linux media ready that will allow you to mount the partition on your Linux system containing Lilo and lilo.conf.

                    1) Boot the Linux system, and using fdisk, cfdisk, or your other preferred partitioning tool, create the partition you intend to use for Windows. Make sure it is a PRIMARY partition, not a logical one. Making it a logical partition could conceivably really fuck things up at installtime.

                    2) If the partition you just created is less than 2GB, set it to type 0x0B (WIN95 OSR2 32-bit FAT). If it is 2GB or larger, set it to type 0x0C (WIN95 OSR2 32-bit FAT, LBA-mapped).

                    3) Write the partition table out, quit your partition editor, and reboot to your Windows bootdisk.

                    4) Format the partition you just created as FAT32. We're only doing this so that Windows picks up on it as being its own.

                    5) Reboot to the Windows installer. It should now see the partition you just created as C: (assuming there are no other FAT32 partitions on the drive). Install to it as normal; feel free to reformat it as NTFS if you want.

                    6) Once installation is complete, you'll need to reboot from your bootable Linux media, remount the partition containing lilo.conf, and rerun Lilo against the new system since Windows *will* obliterate your previous bootloader if it's written to the MBR.

                    Hope this saves someone a reinstall.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by skroo
                      Yep. There is a way around being forced to use the first partition for Windows, though. This can be useful if you have an OS (Linux, for the sake of our discussion) already installed there that you want to keep, and enough free space left on the drive to install a Windows OS.
                      Ah, wasn't aware of this procedure. Learn something new every day.
                      The essential feature of complex behavior is the ability to perform transitions between different states ... Complexity is concerned with systems in which evolution, and hence history plays or has played an important role in the observed behavior.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mindstorm
                        Ah, wasn't aware of this procedure. Learn something new every day.
                        Though it's probably worth mentioning that it's really only useful if you have an existing non-Windows OS on the first partition that you want to keep. If you're doing a clean install, you may as well just install Windows to the first partition and save yourself the complication of going through wth this. Oh, and this method will also work if you're adding a second Windows installation to the same physical drive.

                        Also, just to clarify why you want to use FAT32: all we really want to do here is force the Windows installer to see a partition type it can recognise; every Windows OS from 95 OSR2 will pick up on it. It just happens to be the most convenient lowest-common-denominator filesystem for our needs.

                        You could conceivably use FAT16 (or even FAT12 if you really want to be masochistic), but as they don't support large partitions it's not worth the headache of having to later resize them unless you feel confident running, say, a full Windows 2000 install in less than 520MB.
                        Last edited by skroo; December 16, 2003, 19:07.

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                        • #13
                          mdk9.2 + DLINK+ =SHITTY.

                          FYI

                          liljoker, mdk9.2 MIGHT work well with your wifi card, I am just letting you know if you have any DLINK with a + on the end of the number your in for some real hard times my friend. DLINK+ uses ACX100 chipsets and NOT PRISM2.

                          DLINK BLOWS.
                          DC541 - (linuxscripto) contact linuxscripto@hotmail.com

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                          • #14
                            Mandrake Auto-asign

                            If you don't want to create the partitions manually

                            Put Mandrake CD 1 in drive
                            Reboot
                            Install pops up, choose expert modus
                            When diskdrake pops up, you delete all you previous linux partition (after you've backud up sensitive data of course), you selecte the unallocated space (gray area) and select "auto-asign"

                            I think mandrake will create the following paritions for you:
                            /
                            swap
                            /home

                            Perhaps it's a good idea for you to read the mandrake install guide


                            Like was previously mentioned > avoid using parition magic

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