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  • WLAN card not working in Mandrake

    Just installed Linux for the first time and experimenting with it....feeling the pull away from the evil-monopoly-monster....

    Anyway - I have the Microsoft MN-720 for my HP ze1250.....I can't get it to recognize in Linux and really don't have any idea what I'm doing....any help would be greatly appreciated!

    I've done the normal Google search and searched through Defcon...no avail. Also, any books to help with Mandrake 10.0?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by tallguy
    Just installed Linux for the first time and experimenting with it....feeling the pull away from the evil-monopoly-monster....

    Anyway - I have the Microsoft MN-720 for my HP ze1250.....I can't get it to recognize in Linux and really don't have any idea what I'm doing....any help would be greatly appreciated!

    I've done the normal Google search and searched through Defcon...no avail. Also, any books to help with Mandrake 10.0?

    Thanks!
    There are two [or more] routes to go with this:
    pcmcia-cs
    kernel--based support (modular)

    pcmcia-cs is the "older" way of doing thing which is likely to disappear over time as the second one is more widely supported and accepted.

    kernel-based support with modules (etc) is the other route

    If you just want a card to "work" (defined as be able to make your box participate in a network) the easiest method is to use your package's pcmcia-cs and get the latest version of this and have it work with a 2.4.x kernel. [of course this does not always work, but is the easiest "fix" in most cases.]

    If you want the card to "work" (defined as able to work well with kismet and many other tools) then going with the kernel-based mods is likely what you want to do. If you choose this route, then support for this is better in the 2.6.x kernels.

    Your first step should be google. When google does not help and if nobody offers you an ideal solution to your problems from this forum, the next best bet is to join a LUG (Linux User Group) near you where you can gain support and hands-on assistance form other users. (Trouble shooting wireless card support is a rather interactive process which is best done in person, or in some "live" fashion, not through e-mail or forums [which is like playing chess through snail-mail.])

    With pcmcia-cs, you can examine an HCL:
    http://pcmcia-cs.sourceforge.net/ftp/SUPPORTED.CARDS

    I do not see your card (?Microsoft MN-720?) listed in the current HCL. If the card uses a prism chipset then you have a fair chance of success.

    Next, google is your friend. If you are interested in Linux specific content, then http://www.google.com/linux is your friend.

    http://www.google.com/linux?hl=en&lr...=Google+Search
    Provides:
    http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=177594
    as the first hit.
    And if you look at "post 4"
    http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...342#post914342

    You have a start. Perform some research on this and see what you are able to find. You may need to get your hands dirty and build a new kernel, but it is not nearly as hard as some people try to make it appear.

    [edits listed above]
    Last edited by TheCotMan; May 29, 2004, 17:29. Reason: Fix typos, add exceptions

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TheCotMan
      pcmcia-cs is the "older" way of doing thing which is likely to disappear over time as the second one is more widely supported and accepted.
      actually.. I just started playing with 2.6.6 and discovered that pcmcia-cs modules will not be developed for 2.5> kernels. pcmcia-cs still works great for 2.4.x but compiling them under 2.6.x is just not possible with the stark differences of the new API. alas.. I really don't care for applying patches (hermes ioctls in this case) directly to my kernel source tree unless for specific security reasons... but I guess thats the way the romans want it

      tallguy: microsoft cards use the broadcom chipset, there isn't a specific module developed for it but you may have some luck with http://ndiswrapper.sourceforge.net/ real men have hermes ;)
      if it gets me nowhere, I'll go there proud; and I'm gonna go there free.

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      • #4
        I've been reading up on NDIS and looking around the web.....still no avail.....quite confused....I'm dead set in "Finding a new driver" and it should work. LOL.


        This is quite frustrating. I appreciate the help though. I've seen that site and found a step by step "Type only this" kind of setup, byut of course that didn't work.

        What books do you all suggest?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tallguy
          I've been reading up on NDIS and looking around the web.....still no avail.....quite confused....I'm dead set in "Finding a new driver" and it should work. LOL.


          This is quite frustrating. I appreciate the help though. I've seen that site and found a step by step "Type only this" kind of setup, byut of course that didn't work.

          What books do you all suggest?
          I've been using Linux for over a decade, and back then there weren't any books. It was all about man pages and source code with the occasional HOWTO. As a result, I have not read any.

          Book which have been suggested for learning how to do Linux stuff by people I respect include:
          Linux Network Administrator's Guide
          and
          Essential System Administration

          And as a general book for *NIX: Practical UNIX and internet Security. It is old, and someone might have something more current, but it was a good read for me wayyyy back when.

          However, the best advice I can offer you is this:

          Go to a bookstore, and pick up a few Linux System Admin books and randomly select 10 pages from each. Read each sample page in full. If the writing style is acceptable to you and the content is understandable, then give that book higher marks.

          After you review all of the selected book, choose the one you gave the highest marks.

          Many Oreilly books are great for people who have a good foundation in other areas to make understanding their topic quickly. This means, many of their books are dense and spend little time doing any hand-holding. Thicker books on Linux Administration often walk you through multiple steps and cater to an audience which knows less about the topic covered.

          Each person has their own likes and dislikes in writing. (For example, I absolutley hate the Tannenbaum book on Networking due to the writing style. His OS book is much better for some reason.)

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          • #6
            Definately sounds like one of those things that I just have to stick with and keep reading up on...I appreciate all the help. See you guys in Vegas!

            Comment


            • #7
              Edit: Redundant info already in thread. My apologies.
              When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout.

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