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How did you pick up Lockpicking.

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  • #16
    Sorry to bring up such an old thread but i think that lockpicking is pretty cool and had some input of my own.

    I owned lockpicking tools for about 3 yrs before i actually took the time to learn how to use them properly. At the beggining after repetetiv failure i just bought a snap gun and thought i was good to go.

    Then recently my brother gave me a book and i thought oi might as well try to learn how to use my tools properly. It turned out that the real problem was that i had been aplying too much torque. So in about one evening i learned how to do basic one by one picking of cheap locks. And now i am currently wokring on schlage locks. Kwikset are pretty easy i find.

    The real key (no pun intended) in my case for learning how ot do it was to actually remove most of the pins and then work up from there. So now when i try to teack my friends i give them a lock with only one pin, just so they can get a feel for how a pin binds and what kind of tension is needed. Then i put in another pin and then wokr my way up.

    Currently i am stuck on shlage with 4 pins. I can usually do it as long as its the back pin that is missing, but i think that adding the back pin make it about twice as hard, because its hard ot manouver in there without upsetting the other pins.

    It really only takes 30 sec to a min to open most locks for me, but ive usually practiced on them before.

    One thing that i just cant seem to pick up is raking, i guess im just gonna have to keep trying, which pick do you guys use fo raking? is it the squigly one? (sorry cant think of better description) Generaly i just use the diamond pick for one by one picking.

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    • #17
      Hmm. Well, I have always been a fan of breaking and entering (rather that be doors I card, computer systems, etc) but by no means did I do it for malicious means. I got into lock picking mainly by thinking about it. I ordered an advanced lockpick kit off of Bud K and a book for it. Working at a movie theater at the time, I read the book throughout several times when I had nothing to do (which was often). I then took the time and effort to begin using them -- I would open locks to doors (the party room, office, etc); open cabinet and water machine locks, etc. My manager locked his keys in his office at one point and I spent my time opening the main office door as well. I spent a lot of time working with them at the theater -- I eventually opened up the Pacman arcade machine and set it for free play. :surprised But that took awhile.

      I learned more about lock picking by reading various techniques online. (www.lockpicking101.com) And while working at an arcade for a short while, I learned a lot about various types of locks, how they work, how to break them, etc. I discovered how to rake a 7 pin tumbler with ease as well (even though it takes 2 people for me). I spent a lot of time breaking into machines (even though I had the keys) when no one was around and that further improved my skills. But I'm still no expert. I'm sure that when I get a new job, it will only lead me to more training... nothing else really motivates me.

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      • #18
        I got interested in it from reading Richard Feynman's autobiography, Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman. The whole section on security (or lack thereof) at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project was a hoot, and got me thinking about the physical side of security in general, and lock picking in particular. My first tools were a pair of heavy-duty paperclips, which let me into a lab at work so I could fix a broken PC.

        Never got beyond pure amateur status with it, although I've upgraded my tools considerably. Just a fun diversion that's come in handy from time to time.
        They couldn't hit an elephant from this dist
        - Last words of General John Sedgwick

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        • #19
          I like my threads aged...

          I am looking forward to learning more about lockpicking this year. My first shot at lockpicking was at the first Layer1. Just sitting around with flea and queeg and a bunch of other guys... I want to learn more this year.
          If I had a nickle for every time someone offered me ten cents to keep my two cents to myself... I would be a rich man.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by tizbad99
            It turned out that the real problem was that i had been aplying too much torque.
            yeap, that's one of the two main mistakes that people make when learning to pick, the other being pushing the pins too far up.

            Originally posted by tizbad99
            now when i try to teack my friends i give them a lock with only one pin, just so they can get a feel for how a pin binds and what kind of tension is needed. Then i put in another pin and then wokr my way up.
            that's the best way to learn, in my opinion. in fact, some vendors will sell "lockpicking school kits" (here's one from Southord, scroll down to part number ST-23) or items with similar names. typically, these are low quality locks (like Kwiksets) all keyed alike but with pins removed, so that one cylinder has a single pin stack, the next one has two, and so on up to five. a GREAT way to get the feel for one's picks and learn the basics of manipulation. it's also very satisfying even for impatient people since even a relatively calm chimpanzee can open a lock with one or two pin stacks.

            Originally posted by tizbad99
            I can usually do it as long as its the back pin that is missing, but i think that adding the back pin make it about twice as hard, because its hard ot manouver in there without upsetting the other pins.
            i noticed below in your post you mentioned "Generaly i just use the diamond pick for one by one picking." this is often the case, and a limitation of what is an otherwise really versatile tool. half diamonds (large or small, but i prefer small) are nice in that they are suited to multiple techniques. you can lift pins individually with a diamond, or you can scrub/rake if you wish. ultimately, however, a diamond shape will prove to be less effective for either specific technique than other picks. consider trying to use a finger a.k.a. hook pick if you like lifting indivudal pins (the preferred method of most skilled people i know) or, if you are interested in raking, pick up an S or W rake.

            Originally posted by tizbad99
            One thing that i just cant seem to pick up is raking, i guess im just gonna have to keep trying
            you and me both, man. i am shit when it comes to raking. it's just not a technique i've ever bothered to get really good at. it's a pain, too, since many of the cheaper locks in early rounds of competitions can be raked very quickly if you are skilled at that method. (btw, i always like hearing people's opinion about something with respect to raking... do people who like to rake consider the picks to be one-sided or two-sided? i mean, do you feel there is a specific way that an S or W pick should be inserted? i've played with raking and have been able to pop open some really poor locks with the rake "upside down"... makes me wonder if they were designed specifically one way and i was lucky or if there is no wrong way to rake.

            Originally posted by rjsquirrel
            I got interested in it from reading Richard Feynman's autobiography ... The whole section on security (or lack thereof) at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project was a hoot.
            yeah, i first heard about this in the conclusion of a piece criticizing security through obscurity written by Matt Blaze entitled Keep It Secret, Stupid which described "a story that Richard Feynman famously told about his days on the Manhattan project. Some simple vulnerabilities (and user interface problems) made it easy to open most of the safes in use at Los Alamos. He eventually demonstrated the problem to the Army officials in charge. Horrified, they promised to do something about it. The response? A memo ordering the staff to keep Feynman away from their safes. "

            Originally posted by Siviak
            I am looking forward to learning more about lockpicking this year. ... I want to learn more this year.
            heh... you coming to my talk, man? in addition to some new techniques and tricks i'll also be offering up drinks, swag, and other such prizes. sit where i can see you raise your hand.

            (btw, keep an eye on the schedule since i'm currently slated for sunday afternoon but this is likely going to change to earlier on friday since i'm going to conduct a whole hands-on session with anyone interested after i leave the stage.)
            Last edited by Deviant Ollam; July 11, 2005, 08:07. Reason: adding URL link
            "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
            - Trent Reznor

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            • #21
              I first learned how to pick locks at the lockpicking village at the Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg round late 2015. A friendly fellow showed me how to hold the lock and the tension wrench with one hand and a pick with the other. I bought a picking set and some locks and I brought them to parties when I could until Covid happened.

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