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  • Lockpicking question

    Hey guys, I just got into Lock Picking and i must say it is quite fun and addictive, but i would like to ask if their are any "must read boooks" to Lock Picking or any tools (My mom is mostly the problem here, i can't buy online cuz i must use her CreditCard and nothing to obvious), because ive been using freaking paperclips and a mettal stick.
    PLEASE HELP


    -C0N0F
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  • #2
    Enjoy:

    Click Here

    Click Here For More

    There are more sites that would be of help to you, but I'm lazy and to do not want to post them, so just use Google
    "It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times". Pearl S. Buck

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Be_Th3_Penguin
      i can't buy online cuz i must use her CreditCard and nothing to obvious
      I believe the winner of the first lockpicking competition used homemade lockpicks using the MIT Guide To Lockpicking. Some tools are difficult to make on your own (tubular lockpicks?), but you should be pretty well off using information found on the Internet.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Voltage Spike
        you should be pretty well off using information found on the Internet.
        Yep. I have about 20 to 30 books on the topic, and the bulkier ones just say the same things, but with more words... and trust me, I know about more words. ]:>

        Look thruogh the forums, and you will find Deviant Ollam put up a link to their lock picking presentation in a recent post. This coupled with the MIT Guide to Lockpicking, and you have a great start.

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        • #5
          I believe the winner of the first lockpicking competition used homemade lockpicks using the MIT Guide To Lockpicking. Some tools are difficult to make on your own (tubular lockpicks?), but you should be pretty well off using information found on the Internet.

          I do belive that you can find some of the best tools for lockpicking on ebay. Many are homemade.

          I used a homemade set, untill I lost them.

          Comment


          • #6
            i agree with the comments above... homemade tools can be terrific. in fact, i'm going to mention making one's own picks in my talk this year.

            to augment lil_freak's links, feel free to bounce over to my slides
            "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
            - Trent Reznor

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CP99
              I do belive that you can find some of the best tools for lockpicking on ebay.
              Be careful. Ebay may cancel an auction like that any time. They can even cancel auctions after the auction ends and you make a payment. :-/ (This happened to me with another item. Luckliy, I still got the item.)

              Getting back money from a cancelled auction gone bad will render little help from ebay.

              http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/lockpicking.html
              Last edited by TheCotMan; May 17, 2005, 17:29.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TheCotMan
                Be careful. Ebay may cancel an auction like that any time. They can even cancel auctions after the auction ends and you make a payment. :-/ (This happened to me with another item. Luckliy, I still got the item.)

                Getting back money from a cancelled auction gone bad will render little help from ebay.

                http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/lockpicking.html

                In no way shape or form am I even suggesting ebay and or supporting it.

                Truth be told I hate ebay, and more importantly paypal.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CP99
                  In no way shape or form am I even suggesting ebay and or supporting it.
                  Sorry, I was not attacking your mention of ebay, only warning about risks of using ebay to buy items that ebay bans.

                  Though there are laws against shipping lockpicks with USPS, I don't think they exist for UPS, FedEx, etc..

                  Citations:
                  definition of "Postal Service" in US law.

                  Use of "Postal Service" to Mail locksmith items as reason cited by ebay as why mailing of lockpicks is illegal:
                  [TITLE 39 > PART IV > CHAPTER 30 > § 3002a] and
                  [TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 83 > § 1716A]

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                  • #10
                    Its strange, though. I never knew ebay had a ban on lockpicks till today. Learn useless information all the time. hahah

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TheCotMan
                      god, what a pathetic excuse on the part of eBay. the statue has a clear provision denoting "a bona fide locksmith" as one of the acceptable recipients. anyone who has a legitimate, good faith interest in locksmithing fits that category. notice, the law doesn't read "a licensed locksmith" or "a certified locksmith" or anything else of the sort. anyone with any good faith purpose for manipulating locks... be that purpose vocational, avocational, academic, etc... as long as your interest isn't criminal you're pretty much in the clear as far as the federal statues go.

                      whatever, people in general are way to fucking freaky about security tools and who gets to have them. i'm really looking forward to Tobias' talk and hope that he and his partner speaker get this issue correct. if i have to get up and rant at yet another DefCon about why full and open disclosure is the only appropriate model for true security i'm going to lose significant faith in the tech crowd.
                      "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
                      - Trent Reznor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Deviant Ollam
                        god, what a pathetic excuse on the part of eBay.
                        Since ebay is international, they probably just want to avoid issues in other countries too. Then there are states like New Jersey which have laws that are quite restrictive on possession of lockpicking tools by people not registered with the state as locksmiths.

                        I've heard most states only require a small periodic fee, and sometimes a fingeprint card, but no test to issue locksmith licenses.

                        if i have to get up and rant at yet another DefCon about why full and open disclosure is the only appropriate model for true security i'm going to lose significant faith in the tech crowd.
                        There is division on this topic in the private sector. I suspect many at DC would agree with this view, while marketing folks would disagree.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheCotMan
                          Then there are states like New Jersey which have laws that are quite restrictive on possession of lockpicking tools by people not registered with the state as locksmiths.
                          i don't know if you're accurate on that one. i live in NJ so i've researched the laws pretty thoroughly. in fact, state laws are covered in my presentation.

                          almost all state laws place lockpicks under their "burglary tools" statute. and almost every state's burglary tools statute has an intent clause... meaning that unless the surrounding circumstances are evidence that you were in the process of committing a crime or were planning on committing a crime, you weren't breaking the law.

                          as far as i can tell, there are only four states that have laws on the books worth paying extra attention to...

                          DE - there is no "intent" clause accompanying the standard text of the "burglary tools" statute

                          MS - these fuckers call carrying picks a prima facia case for prosecution. translated, that means that your mere posession of picks is evidence on its face that you planned to do something nefarious

                          NV - to my vegas people (and to those of us going to DefCon) who the hell knows. your state laws are written in a confusing manner.

                          NC - North Carolina is the only state which i've found that specifically mentions the requirement of licensing in their criminal statutes. while i certainly imagine that being a licensed locksmith has weight in any juristiction, it appears that most states rely much more on the intent portion of the situation than whether or not you're a locksmith by trade (hell... even locksmiths can commit crimes, right)

                          this, of course, doesn't have much bearing on municipal ordinances, of which there are many. NYC, for example, is really draconian about people carrying lockpicks around. I'd imagine that NJ has many cities (especially in the north) with similar laws.
                          "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
                          - Trent Reznor

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Deviant Ollam
                            i don't know if you're accurate on that one. i live in NJ so i've researched the laws pretty thoroughly. in fact, state laws are covered in my presentation.
                            May have been posted previously, but FYI anyways

                            In Alberta, to posess/buy/carry/use/hold picks you need a gov't 'pick license', otherwise it's possible to be charged for felony posession of a burglry tool. Very draconian considering thier definition of lockpicks (and 'automotive master keys') is (paraphrased): 'Anything that can be used to manipulate a locking mechanism of any house, business, car or other property', Meaning, just about anything they want to call a pick. However, I have not found any cases where someone was charged just for having pick tools so I'm pretty comfortable about having my picks, I just keep them out of sight.

                            Similar laws in Saskatchewan, but BC does'nt have any such restriction, and Ontario has no policy at all.

                            This limits you to home-made and anything you pick up out-of-province. Local suppliers are meticulous about seeing a license before selling you anything, and Canada Customs can (have'nt tried) hold shipments from across the border until they see a pick license.

                            I'm actually in the process of filing the paperwork right now to get my license. Should know in a few weeks if I qualified or not.

                            All I know is that I'll be fed-exing my tools down and back because I'll be passing through 5 states and I have no idea which ones it would be prohibited in or not.
                            Never drink anything larger than your head!





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                            • #15
                              thx

                              dude, you guys rock, thanks for all the great info!!!
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