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  • pringle can antenna

    Hi all,

    This is my first post.
    I want to know wwhat a pringle can is made up of that every one use it for antenna.
    What are wall of can is made of and what is base of can made of.

    Help me please.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by sahir
    This is my first post.
    Oh yes it is!

    I want to know wwhat a pringle can is made up of that every one use it for antenna. What are wall of can is made of and what is base of can made of.
    The can is cardboard on the outside with a foil lining on the inside. The base is metal.

    Help me please.
    First one's free: cantenna links.

    Comment


    • #3
      sparkling magic spooge is the secret ingrediant.
      if it gets me nowhere, I'll go there proud; and I'm gonna go there free.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by converge
        sparkling magic spooge is the secret ingrediant.
        Hey... Don't use the secret hax0r name for it in public. You'll lose l33t points and never be able to send away for that Sea Monkey set.

        Comment


        • #5
          Be careful where you are using your sparkling magic spooge antenna, 'The Man' has caught on to us 1337 h4x0rs and is keeping his eye out for us.
          http://hardware.slashdot.org/article...tid=193&tid=17

          You may have to copy and paste the link, slashdot seems to enjoy checking refers.
          ยง

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by nak
            Be careful where you are using your sparkling magic spooge antenna, 'The Man' has caught on to us 1337 h4x0rs and is keeping his eye out for us.
            http://hardware.slashdot.org/article...tid=193&tid=17
            For as much as this has been being said, nobody's yet been able to provide the text of a specific law stating that sale or posession of a cantenna is actually illegal. At best you could be charged with any number of Title 18 (specifically probably Section 119 amongst other) offences, but you'd pretty much have to be caught in the act to make it stick.

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            • #7
              Is that the same deal as possessing a whole bunch of two liter bottles as you drive out to the desert with your firearms? Way back when they caught some dudes doing just that, they even had a little adapter to mount the bottles on their firearms. Charges were dropped as possession of the parts does not constitute the completed part. (And that is why a receiver of a firearm is the "entire" firearm)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by skroo
                For as much as this has been being said, nobody's yet been able to provide the text of a specific law stating that sale or posession of a cantenna is actually illegal.
                I think the slashdot summary did an excellent job of representing the situation: "The recent arrests in Florida and the UK of men who were accessing unsecured wireless hotspots has created a flood of articles that contain panic inducing[sic] rhetoric."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by astcell
                  Is that the same deal as possessing a whole bunch of two liter bottles as you drive out to the desert with your firearms? Way back when they caught some dudes doing just that, they even had a little adapter to mount the bottles on their firearms. Charges were dropped as possession of the parts does not constitute the completed part. (And that is why a receiver of a firearm is the "entire" firearm)
                  Thats where you get into laws regarding 'constructive intent'. For example here in Washington I own an AR-15. If I had a full auto bolt , a full auto fire control group, and a 14.5" barrel tucked away in a box, I could get busted for 'constructive intent' even though the parts weren't installed in the gun.

                  However, you couldnt even get that far with the cantenna. It is legal to make your own antennas. Heck, the ARRL has a great book on doing just that, and its an activity HAM operators engage in on a regular basis. Fry's electronics and a ton of online retailers sell pre-built antennas. How is any of this illegal? If you were to use the antenna to commit a crime, the focus should be on the crime itself and not the tools used. If I used a cantenna to sit back and sniff wireless financial transactions, I should be busted for stealing/eavesdropping on financial transactions, not the posession of a cantenna. If such a thing is illegal, then many, many HAM operators are in some serious trouble.

                  I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    HAM operators get some slack. They can have scanners in their car (illegal in CA except for most civilians) and tweak antennas and stuff.

                    I agree that they should charge you with the crime done with a tool and not necessarily the tool itself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lt. Lozito has claims to have been misquoted. This was posted (secondhand) today on the NetStumbler Forums:

                      I have received several comments about my "Quote" in the article.
                      Suffice it to say, that the media does not always capture everything
                      said in a phone interview and then translate it to paper as it was
                      intended.

                      What I was referring to was the use of the devices to locate an open
                      port or signal and then once found, accessing the system to conduct
                      unlawful activity.

                      The possession of the device itself is not illegal however I believe
                      that in time, the law may look at such devices much as it does for
                      burglary tools for someone that has been convicted of burglary or
                      related crimes.

                      If my comment caused some confusion, I apologize.

                      Lt. Bob Lozito
                      Operations Commander
                      Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task Force
                      While I can't verify that this is actually from Lt. Lozito, I can tell you from personal experience that the media is not any better at getting the quote from a LEO correct, than they are with anyone else.

                      http://www.netstumbler.org/showthrea...181#post129181
                      Thorn
                      "If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning." - Catherine Aird

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by noid
                        Thats where you get into laws regarding 'constructive intent'. For example here in Washington I own an AR-15. If I had a full auto bolt , a full auto fire control group, and a 14.5" barrel tucked away in a box, I could get busted for 'constructive intent' even though the parts weren't installed in the gun.
                        More than a few people have learned the hard way that if the ATF comes down on you, they can take anything they find in your house, and if any combination of the things they find can be demonstrated to cause a weapon you have to fire FA, you get shitcanned for NFA. This is still amusingly considered tax fraud, because you evaded the NFA tax.

                        It all goes back to '81 when ATF decided that auto sears were in and of themselves full machine guns even though it takes more than a sear and an ar-clone to go FA.
                        If you can remember DefCon, you weren't really there...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Collection of do-it-yourself wi-fi antennas.
                          Has it been 11 years yet?

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