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  • Bikers and hackers?

    Hello.

    I am somewhat active in the biker scene, no I am not a billy badass out to prove something, I just like the freedom that a bike gives and like to ride with likewise minded people.
    I also like to hack, like as in finding out how shit really works, the more "secret" the more I want to know.
    As we are all well aware, hacking is now the great taboo, no matter what we are really doing.
    This is kind of like the biker scene, the media has made both out to be some sort of counter culture thing that will corrupt all of society at a moments notice.
    So, what do you think, is there a connection? and if so, could this be something that could somehow be helpful?
    I think that a cross between a Harley and a really killer linux box would be wild.
    Just think, you could take your case out for a spin!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Cowthief
    I also like to hack, like as in finding out how shit really works, the more "secret" the more I want to know.
    As in Victoria's Secret because I want to know just what her secret is also.

    Originally posted by Cowthief
    As we are all well aware, hacking is now the great taboo, no matter what we are really doing.
    I think Hacking is more along the lines of Hollywoods favorite buzz word than it is taboo

    Originally posted by Cowthief
    This is kind of like the biker scene, the media has made both out to be some sort of counter culture thing that will corrupt all of society at a moments notice. So, what do you think, is there a connection? and if so, could this be something that could somehow be helpful?
    I figured American Chopper has done wonders for bikers reps all around the world.

    Originally posted by Cowthief
    I think that a cross between a Harley and a really killer linux box would be wild. Just think, you could take your case out for a spin!
    You must have different concepts of fun than I do.
    Did Everquest teach you that?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Cowthief
      [chop]I also like to hack, like as in finding out how shit really works, the more "secret" the more I want to know.
      This really depends on your definition of a hacker. A common theme that seems to be shared among many definitions includes the keyword "unconventional." In this way, nearly any "fringe" group that has been marginalized as a result of their unconventional approach to dealing with "problems" could be considered related to hacking.
      The auto industry was spawned from mechanical hackers working in garages to invent new solutions to problems. Some of the first "town car mechanics" made money building or assembling automobiles. Parallels exist when comparing the creators of HP and Apple starting in their own garages.

      As we are all well aware, hacking is now the great taboo, no matter what we are really doing.
      I think hacking has been a taboo for a long time. Consider early pioneers that broke with convention.
      * "The earth is not the center of the universe" (Gallileo, who was accused of being a heretic)
      * "The earth is not flat, but round." (Aristotle ~300 BC provided evidence but it took ~400 years to be commonly accepted by many educated people.
      * "Not only is the earth a sphere, but here is the size, as computed by the ration of the length of shadows of tall objects as measured at the same time on different locations of the earth." (Eratosthenes: ~200BC, but peers complain, "It does not make sense! Why would water curve on the surface of the earth?")

      This is kind of like the biker scene, the media has made both out to be some sort of counter culture thing that will corrupt all of society at a moments notice.
      So, what do you think, is there a connection? and if so, could this be something that could somehow be helpful?
      Perhaps both groups include members that are marginalized because of the unconventional approach to solving problems, and there may be a higher percentage of hackers in biker groups than the general population, but I don't see any causation, only correlation.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TheCotMan
        This really depends on your definition of a hacker. A common theme that seems to be shared among many definitions includes the keyword "unconventional." In this way, nearly any "fringe" group that has been marginalized as a result of their unconventional approach to dealing with "problems" could be considered related to hacking.
        The auto industry was spawned from mechanical hackers working in garages to invent new solutions to problems. Some of the first "town car mechanics" made money building or assembling automobiles. Parallels exist when comparing the creators of HP and Apple starting in their own garages.


        I think hacking has been a taboo for a long time. Consider early pioneers that broke with convention.
        * "The earth is not the center of the universe" (Gallileo, who was accused of being a heretic)
        * "The earth is not flat, but round." (Aristotle ~300 BC provided evidence but it took ~400 years to be commonly accepted by many educated people.
        * "Not only is the earth a sphere, but here is the size, as computed by the ration of the length of shadows of tall objects as measured at the same time on different locations of the earth." (Eratosthenes: ~200BC, but peers complain, "It does not make sense! Why would water curve on the surface of the earth?")


        Perhaps both groups include members that are marginalized because of the unconventional approach to solving problems, and there may be a higher percentage of hackers in biker groups than the general population, but I don't see any causation, only correlation.
        well, hackers can be described in three ways, a white hat does no damage, they are recruited to help other networks. crackers, do damage, but not as bad as black hat hackers, who do as muck damage as possible, go to http://www.msu.edu/~wolvenca/types.html for more info on different types of hackers

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        • #5
          Originally posted by josh_b_010
          well, hackers can be described in three ways, a white hat does no damage, they are recruited to help other networks. crackers, do damage, but not as bad as black hat hackers, who do as muck damage as possible, go to http://www.msu.edu/~wolvenca/types.html for more info on different types of hackers
          wow.. was that text copied fomr a 6th grader's class project or something? while i can see that the author at least was able to distinguish between various types of individuals, the generalizations are very broad and encourage the myth that "hackers" can be pegged easily into different categories, most of them malicious (unless one is assisting a corporation and working within the lines of a profit motive)

          </mini-rant>
          "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
          - Trent Reznor

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          • #6
            Nice to know I fit into one of three catagories. And a super thank you for propagating these stereotypes! Now my life has definition.

            I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

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            • #7
              I feel so left out. I'm not a whitehat, greyhat or blackhat, and I tend to avoid RedHat. I am more of an asshat.

              Where is the "asshat" described? I want my life to have meaning too! ]:>

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Deviant Ollam
                wow.. was that text copied fomr a 6th grader's class project or something? while i can see that the author at least was able to distinguish between various types of individuals, the generalizations are very broad and encourage the myth that "hackers" can be pegged easily into different categories, most of them malicious (unless one is assisting a corporation and working within the lines of a profit motive)
                Does that mean that if a hacker is assisting a corporation and working within the lines of a profit motive that the malicious damage that is done to someone else is acceptable? For instance someone assisting RCA to hack Sony or something along those lines as long as he/she is making a profit? I don't think that that type of hacking can be justified. I think that hacking is acceptable as a tool to test ones own products or networks in order to make them "hack-proof" (for lack of a better word). Any other form of hacking is not only illegal but unethical as well. Or is my way of looking at hacking wrong?
                I enjoy talking to myself...it's usually the only intelligent conversations I get to have.

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                • #9
                  well murder is acceptable as long as it is in the name of the government apparently, why should this be any different?


                  Web Hosting --

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by enigma
                    well murder is acceptable as long as it is in the name of the government apparently, why should this be any different?
                    The word "murder" is like killing but includes an illegal element to it. Since laws are made/enforced by government, "government-sactioned murder" seems an oxymoron in most applications.

                    Discussions on legal issues may be fine, but for people responding, please don't let this thread go the way of politics or religion.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Floydr47
                      Does that mean that if a hacker is assisting a corporation and working within the lines of a profit motive that the malicious damage that is done to someone else is acceptable?
                      just to clarify, i was quoting the tenor of the article, even in my parenthasized phrase... seems the original post link made that sentiment... it's one with which i dissagree greatly.
                      "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
                      - Trent Reznor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by josh_b_010
                        well, hackers can be described in three ways, a white hat does no damage, they are recruited to help other networks. crackers, do damage, but not as bad as black hat hackers, who do as muck damage as possible, go to http://www.msu.edu/~wolvenca/types.html for more info on different types of hackers

                        I hate you and I hope you die.
                        Have a nice day.
                        perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cowthief
                          Hello.


                          I think that a cross between a Harley and a really killer linux box would be wild.
                          Just think, you could take your case out for a spin!
                          A while back some of us had been toying with the idea of a motorcycle/server. We thought building the boxes into the saddlebags of a Honda Goldwing with the keyboard and monitors mounted on the passenger seat. We thought it would be neat to take a cross country trip and writing about it on a website that would be hosted on the bike.
                          "There are no failed experiments, only more data"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just to keep this going, I tossed an old laptop running kismet in my saddlebag one day and did some wardriving.

                            I've also thought about Abby's idea and wired up a support rig to keep a laptop going off bike power and using some type of cellular modem to write about a trip, but I've cancelled Sprint, so the cheap modem's gone...and I just don't ride enough for fun these days.

                            One thing I have given some thought to is replacing the defunct Blaupunkt in my dash of the bike with either an mp3 player and full hookups to the onboard speakers, volume control, etc...or going the microPC route with an LCD, touch screen, and so on.

                            Either way, most people I have seen in my 10+ years of riding that either identify heavily with the 'biker' or 'hacker' mythos, couldn't give a shit less about the other.
                            Aut disce aut discede

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chris
                              I hate you and I hope you die.
                              Have a nice day.
                              And to think.. he is quoting a webpage made by this tard:
                              http://www.msu.edu/~wolvenca/IM000127.jpg
                              Happiness is a belt-fed weapon.

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