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  • Schematics?

    I'm looking for a place to get the information on the in depth workings of a computer, just the average usual computer in most people's homes. what I mean is, I want to know, exactly, how a computer runs. From how a processor manages all of the computer components to how the operating systems are written. I want to get deep into the insides of computers, and know how every component contributes to the machine that each of you are veiwing this with. I must know the inner workings of one of the greatest tools in history! I don't expect anyone to know where I can find the "guide to everything", but any help you can give will be appreciated.

  • #2
    Any book on the A+ certification would be a good start. Also, nothing beats the hands-on experience. Find a computer and start taking it apart yourself (with good notes, of course, so you can put it back together).
    "\x74\x68\x65\x70\x72\x65\x7a\x39\x38";

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr.A
      I'm looking for a place to get the information on the in depth workings of a computer, just the average usual computer in most people's homes. what I mean is, I want to know, exactly, how a computer runs. From how a processor manages all of the computer components to how the operating systems are written. I want to get deep into the insides of computers, and know how every component contributes to the machine that each of you are veiwing this with. I must know the inner workings of one of the greatest tools in history! I don't expect anyone to know where I can find the "guide to everything", but any help you can give will be appreciated.
      Do a google on "upgrading and repairing computers"

      Al
      "Are my pants...threatening you?"

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      • #4
        Do you really want to know how a compuer works at the schematic level with gates? (If not, the skip this and consider the posts above.)

        Academia is actually a good place to go to learn about these things-- mostly because you have people that know the topic who can guide you, answer questions, and help you with, hopefully, years of experience lecturing.

        Even if you can't get into academics or can't go to college for some reason, MIT put up a number of course videos and content online, free:
        http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Global/OCWHelp/avocw.htm

        If you are a self-starter, and do well with books, you could probably do well with a book on boolean mathematics, especially one that also covers truth tables, and emphasis with optimization on size/gate-numbers.

        Once you understand boolean logic, perhaps you can get a book on circuit design. Maybe a book that covers the construction of a calculator with gates and a clock.

        From here you have the basic concept of a CPU:
        Memory, Data, Instructions, and clock cycles.

        Then a book on Computer Architecture might be good. Maybe something that covers the x86 or something like MIPS. Such a book can help you to understand how various levels of caching work, and things like "read-ahead" and predictive branching, and staged processing to increase efficiency in cases where branches are less common.

        Then, after that, pick up a simpler OS. Minix was sort-of designed to be small enough to be used in OS courses and be understood by a single person.

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        • #5
          You've all been such good help! especially Cotman, wow! This is what I like about this site, you get good answers FAST. Not people pretty much doing what stupid doctors do and refer you to someplace else, alklloyd I'm looking at you :P. I'll be sure to check all of these answers and get right onto my fun weekend of computer ripping, book readin', OS analyzin' fun! :D

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr.A
            You've all been such good help! especially Cotman, wow! This is what I like about this site, you get good answers FAST. Not people pretty much doing what stupid doctors do and refer you to someplace else, alklloyd I'm looking at you :P. I'll be sure to check all of these answers and get right onto my fun weekend of computer ripping, book readin', OS analyzin' fun! :D
            If you are going to DefCon this year, you may want to consider entering one of the TCP/IP Device Contests. (Check the contest section.)
            Lost and Neural are running 1 contest with one or more sub-contests in the "Net Appliance" contest
            And the TCP/IP Enabled Device and Peripheral Contest is coming back for a 3rd or 4th year.

            Both of these contests include work with building things, and will give you experience with hardware and programming. Also, they will give you opportunity to socialize with like-minded people. (Inventors, builders, people with technical backgrounds and/or desire to learn.)

            Kallahar is running the DC Robots contest too, which is another opportunity to participate, learn and make friends with people who build and program devices.

            Check them out, build something, compete.

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            • #7
              Dude, that wasn't a slag. That book can teach you more about hardware than any other book I know...nothing like getting "hands-on" to learn.

              Al
              "Are my pants...threatening you?"

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              • #8
                The problem with *truly*fully understanding the modern computer is that it is a huge task. Fully understanding the mechanical design of a hitachi drive will keep your ass busy for a bit.. let alone all of the other components that go into the computer. If you are talking from a logical point of view, do some pooping around towards learning Assembly. Its not at all practical from a mass-developer standpoint, but it really gives you a more solid understanding of what the computer is actually doing when you issue the higher level instructions in other languages. Its not voodoo.
                if it gets me nowhere, I'll go there proud; and I'm gonna go there free.

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