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  • question for people working in the industry.

    don't flame me plz.
    anyway.
    im about to get an AS in networking and then move on to a university to complete a BS in information systems technology. my question is for people already working in the industry if i should spend the money on more involved certifications (i have a cna and a+ already) like the cisco or microsoft ones or if the bs is enough to secure a decent position.
    I have worked off and on while going to school (some tech support call center work and as a network techinician for the county here) and the certifications that i have already did seem to make a difference but i didn't have a degree at the time.
    any insight you guys with more experience could offer would be greatly appreciated.
    thanks!
    - fhqwhgads

  • #2
    I would get as many certs as you can in the field you plan on getting into. Alot of companies are requiring certs for entry level jobs. The BA is nice to have but the certs show some specilization.
    The penguin is watching.
    "The DefCon forums dont reward knowledge, but punish iggnorance." -Noid

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    • #3
      Originally posted by EeeekPenguins
      I would get as many certs as you can in the field you plan on getting into. Alot of companies are requiring certs for entry level jobs. The BA is nice to have but the certs show some specilization.
      thats what i figured.....
      i dunno. is ms still doing 2000 certs or have they changed the tests for 2003?
      its just 7 tests isn't something i want to get into if its not needed
      Last edited by LiteHedded; February 3, 2004, 21:37.
      - fhqwhgads

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      • #4
        From my humble viewpoint, the MS certs are complete bullshit. There's rarely a company that will view them as essential to anyone with a Bachelor's degree in a computer science. Of course, people will always argue that they give you one more punch in a competition, but as a hiring manager, a certification list doesn't do anywhere near the justice as a solid presentation of knowledge and professionalism. I'd spend a 10th the time you would spend on your MCSE in learning how to write an effective cover letter. Take some time to review job postings (Try the US job bank for starters) and get a feel for the 360 different computer related fields that are out there. Cisco certs are of little importance to large corporations hiring System Administrators, as Network Engineering will not fall into the duties of the sys admins. It's always great to know more, but if your looking to make more money, find the needs of a specific title that interests you and get as much specialized training and certification in that field as possible. Try to focus your skills as much as possible, not broaden them, Your B.S. is broad enough.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mr. Peabody
          From my humble viewpoint, the MS certs are complete bullshit. There's rarely a company that will view them as essential to anyone with a Bachelor's degree in a computer science. Of course, people will always argue that they give you one more punch in a competition, but as a hiring manager, a certification list doesn't do anywhere near the justice as a solid presentation of knowledge and professionalism. I'd spend a 10th the time you would spend on your MCSE in learning how to write an effective cover letter. Take some time to review job postings (Try the US job bank for starters) and get a feel for the 360 different computer related fields that are out there. Cisco certs are of little importance to large corporations hiring System Administrators, as Network Engineering will not fall into the duties of the sys admins. It's always great to know more, but if your looking to make more money, find the needs of a specific title that interests you and get as much specialized training and certification in that field as possible. Try to focus your skills as much as possible, not broaden them, Your B.S. is broad enough.
          well i've taken all of the microsoft classes (they were part of the as degree) so going in for the tests would just mean brushing up a little. and finding the cash of course. maybe i'll hold off on them for now.

          oh and my bs isn't in computer science it's IST
          here is more info on the ist program
          Last edited by LiteHedded; February 3, 2004, 22:20.
          - fhqwhgads

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          • #6
            Although the article itself contains little information pertaining to your question the comments below come from those mostly in the field of IT, makes alot of good points both for and against certs.
            Vegas...It's like Falluja but without a last call!

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            • #7
              what article lux?
              - fhqwhgads

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LiteHedded
                well i've taken all of the microsoft classes (they were part of the as degree) so going in for the tests would just mean brushing up a little. and finding the cash of course. maybe i'll hold off on them for now.

                oh and my bs isn't in computer science it's IST
                here is more info on the ist program

                Looks to me like your already accredited by your University. The way education was intended to be I might add. The whole process of microsoft certifications sparked a trend in the mid 90s when many universities did not offer competitive courses. Again, I think they're just a waste of money.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Peabody
                  From my humble viewpoint, the MS certs are complete bullshit. There's rarely a company that will view them as essential to anyone with a Bachelor's degree in a computer science. Of course, people will always argue that they give you one more punch in a competition, but as a hiring manager, a certification list doesn't do anywhere near the justice as a solid presentation of knowledge and professionalism. I'd spend a 10th the time you would spend on your MCSE in learning how to write an effective cover letter. Take some time to review job postings (Try the US job bank for starters) and get a feel for the 360 different computer related fields that are out there. Cisco certs are of little importance to large corporations hiring System Administrators, as Network Engineering will not fall into the duties of the sys admins. It's always great to know more, but if your looking to make more money, find the needs of a specific title that interests you and get as much specialized training and certification in that field as possible. Try to focus your skills as much as possible, not broaden them, Your B.S. is broad enough.

                  Listen to him.

                  Originally posted by EeeekPenguins
                  I would get as many certs as you can in the field you plan on getting into. Alot of companies are requiring certs for entry level jobs. The BA is nice to have but the certs show some specilization.

                  Not him.

                  I have had a relatively good track record in information security and only have one cert...IAM, and I got that AFTER I had had my current job for more than two years.

                  To be honest, when a CISSP comes across my desk as a potential interview...I need to see more because I find it to be a waste.

                  We laugh at MCSE's.

                  We scoff at CCNAs...give slight credence to CCNPs and have never actually had a CCIE come across.

                  GIAC seems decent, but still doesn't have much weight, and by the time it does, it will probably be so watered down that it is as useless as a CISSP.

                  I have been asked in interviews about my lack of certs and I have always been honest and told the interviewer that I think they are a waste. It hasn't held me back yet. A degree with a good GPA and a good, specifically tailored to the position you are applying for, cover letter will get you much further than any silly ass cert.
                  perl -e 'print pack(c5, (41*2), sqrt(7056), (unpack(c,H)-2), oct(115), 10)'

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                  • #10
                    that's kinda what i was thinking chris.
                    - fhqwhgads

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LiteHedded
                      don't flame me plz.
                      anyway.
                      im about to get an AS in networking and then move on to a university to complete a BS in information systems technology.
                      Get a BA/BS in something - IST is fine, you really don't need CS.

                      I would recommend taking some english courses though, employers like their employees being able to use capilitzation.

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                      • #12
                        i'll keep the capitalization thing in mind when typing up resumes
                        - fhqwhgads

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chris
                          I have had a relatively good track record in information security and only have one cert...IAM, and I got that AFTER I had had my current job for more than two years.

                          To be honest, when a CISSP comes across my desk as a potential interview...I need to see more because I find it to be a waste.

                          We laugh at MCSE's.

                          We scoff at CCNAs...give slight credence to CCNPs and have never actually had a CCIE come across.

                          GIAC seems decent, but still doesn't have much weight, and by the time it does, it will probably be so watered down that it is as useless as a CISSP.
                          :D exactly what I'm talking about. After 10 years in IT, I've got 1 certification, StarBase StarTeam. I've taken a handful of "professional education" courses in a variety or things like unix system administration, oracle dba, e-commerce, wireless technology, etc. but these were all provided by my employer to suppplement my knowledge. In the end, my degree and professionalism has carried me all the way.

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                          • #14
                            these are the answers i was expecting. thank you all for the replies
                            - fhqwhgads

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                            • #15
                              My NT MCSE education helped a little, but timing is everything. An NT MCSE is pretty worthless today, even the MCSE for W2K is outdated.

                              On the other hand, my college degree is 11 years old and still going strong.

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