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  • #16
    Originally posted by astcell
    My grades improved dramatically when I started to answer what the teacher wanted to hear as opposed to what was right.
    lol! that is so damn true.
    "so many books, so little time"

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by bobaxos
      ... My question to you is why is that question in
      there and what are you going to do about it?
      Thanks to the media, the term hacker has been warped into the equivalent of malicious.

      In addition, it may be nice to rethink the email wording next time. Using the word "you" in the last portion of the email pungently reeks of "anal retentive smartass".
      :)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by astcell
        My grades improved dramatically when I started to answer what the teacher wanted to hear as opposed to what was right.
        Yep. I have found the same to be true. When I was the smart-ass who correct ed teachers, my grades would suffer, but when I stopped, and pretended to agree, my grades improved.

        Grades only measure two things:
        1) your ability to follow directions
        2) your agreement with what the teacher states

        Liberal arts courses seem to favor 2 more than 1 while hard sciences tend to favor 1 over 2.

        The real purpose of Liberal Arts courses for people is to help them lie to people, stroke egos, and become a general brown-noser. This idea of them existing to create a well rounded person?

        Ha! I know the TRUTH!

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        • #19
          Ive found the forest animal analogy to be quite correct.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by pezz
            Ive found the forest animal analogy to be quite correct.
            Sorry for my ignorance, but I have tried google with variations on "forest animal analogy" and was not able to find any references [wrt education]. What is this?

            TIA

            [Edit: added content above in [ ] and below in response to reply:]
            (Did not want to create a new post for this thank-you)

            Originally posted by Mathias Dyson
            I think pezz was referring to bobaxos's second email to his instructor where he used the analogy on the animal rights activist eating the hamburger.
            Ahhh yes... that makes more sense. Thanks!

            (Boy do I feel stupid for not noticing that, and spending my time searching for academic papers with analogy of forest animals to teachers or students... heh:-)
            Last edited by TheCotMan; June 16, 2004, 01:30. Reason: added content

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            • #21
              Originally posted by TheCotMan
              Sorry for my ignorance, but I have tried google with variations on "forest animal analogy" and was not able to find any references [wrt education]. What is this?
              Originally posted by bobaxos
              What you suggest is the same as an animal rights activist
              protesting the butchering of cows while eating a hamburger.
              CotMan,

              I think pezz was referring to bobaxos's second email to his instructor where he used the analogy on the animal rights activist eating the hamburger.

              Hope this helps,
              Dyson

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              • #22
                You could have solved it much easier by just posting his email address here.

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                • #23
                  i would at least pm it to some of you but the online software doesnt actually do email addresses, its more of a PM system. Just like on this forum.

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                  • #24
                    perhaps the job for you.

                    Hey,

                    I enjoyed your test question...couldn`t agree with you more.

                    Perhaps, I have some homework for you!

                    Let me know,

                    Alan


                    alanfree69@yahoo.com

                    Guatemala
                    Originally posted by bobaxos
                    I took an online easy as hell class it was titled "Technology as the Future" or some crap. Basically it was a history on technology, (TV, radio, computers and so on.) with a little look on where its headed. I just finished taking the final and well here was a question that had no right being there considering there was never any talk about security or even the term "hacker"

                    here is the question in its pure unedited form:
                    <question>
                    44. (2 point(s))
                    A person who utilizes computers and computer networksto illegally gather information from other computersor
                    computer networks is known as a:

                    1. novice
                    2. beavis
                    3. slacker
                    4. hacker
                    5. al gore
                    Save Answer

                    </question>
                    I picked al gore and emailed the teacher about this question, still no response.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by TheCotMan
                      Grades only measure two things:
                      1) your ability to follow directions
                      2) your agreement with what the teacher states

                      Liberal arts courses seem to favor 2 more than 1 while hard sciences tend to favor 1 over 2.
                      I'd be inclined to say that 2) s/b "your ability to regurgitate what the teacher states" I can regurg without agreeing, and get the same grade.
                      Ya got no legs, don't come crawlin' to me.

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                      • #26
                        just to clarify the 2 points that the teacher offered wouldnt have effected my grade.

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                        • #27
                          What's the English language coming to [sic]?

                          I have no idea what your grades are, but they can only improve by learning the difference between "too" and "to", "principal" and "principle", and "affect" and "effect."

                          As for what the word "Hacker" means, it's the most futile of geek pedantry. A word's meaning is determined by its usage, and "hacker" has so long meant "malicious attacker of computer systems" to the general public that it's pointless to argue differently.

                          In this case, the question is correct. A person it describes is in fact known to most of the public as a hacker. Lots of technogeek types would rather that word were reserved for hardcore programmers, and the illegal attackers called "crackers", but that doesn't change the fact that the world at large doesn't use the word that way. It's useless to rail on the correct meaning of a word like hacker.

                          In geek terms: hacker is an overloaded identifier. In English, words can have multiple meanings. It just so happens that the word "hacker" has evolved to mean both hardcore brainy programmer types and people who illegally access computer systems. That's English for you.

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                          • #28
                            Zhym your right the english language is pretty complicated. But that doesnt mean (against all odds) that we cant change the meaning of a word such as hacker.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              By Chuck Swindoll

                              -----------

                              Once upon a time, the animals decided they should do something meaningful to meet the problems of the new world. So they organized a school.
                              They adopted an activity curriculum of running, climbing, swimming and flying. To make it easier to administer the curriculum, all the animals took all the subjects.
                              The duck was excellent at swimming; in fact, better than his instructor. But he made only passing grades in flying, and was very poor at running. Since he was slow in running, he had to drop swimming and stay after school to practice running. This caused his web feet to be badly worn, so that he was only average in swimming. But average was quite acceptable so nobody worried about that--except the duck.
                              The rabbit started at the top of his class in running, but developed a nervous twitch in his leg muscles because of so much make-up work in swimming.
                              The squirrel was excellent in climbing, but he encountered constant frustration in flying class because his teacher made him start from the ground up instead of from the treetop down. He developed "charlie horses" from overexertion, and so only got a C in climbing and a D in running.
                              The eagle was a problem child and was severely disciplined for being a non-conformist. In climbing he beat all the others to the top of the tree, but insisted on using his way to get there . . . .
                              A duck is a duck--and only a duck. It is built to swim, not to run or fly and certainly not to climb. A squirrel is a squirrel--and only that. To move it out of its forte, climbing, and then expect it to swim or fly will drive a squirrel nuts. Eagles are beautiful creatures in the air but not in a foot race. The rabbit will win every time unless, of course, the eagle gets hungry.

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                              • #30
                                Ive been lucky that the instructors Ive been assigned for tech classes, were open minded. One instructor put me to work as a teachers assistant, and another had me lecture the class on hardware, and update his syllabus. Im my instances I wasnt penalized for my knowledge.

                                The community college I attended didnt realize that technology changes rapidly.. and that books need to be changed every year.. if not every semester for tech classes. The book I was using in 2000 was talking about 486 CPU's the invention of the DX co-processor, and pentium 1. The instructor didnt even know about DDR, or SDRAM, AMD as an alternative to Intel, and didnt understand the basic concepts of DSL and Cable Modem.

                                They were still teach token ring, cluster, and star networks, as a lesson plan.

                                A deffinate sign, that I needed to take classes somewhere else if I wanted to actually learn something.

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