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  • and they say tech support sucks

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,171617,00.html
    It had to be the dumbest customer-service call ever.

    Lancaster County (search), Neb., sheriff's deputies say a man couldn't get a stolen laptop computer to work — so he called the manufacturer's toll-free tech-support number for help.

    The IBM ThinkPad was reported missing after a rural home burglary Sept. 13, but there were few leads until IBM called, reports the Lincoln (Neb.) Journal-Star.

    It turned out someone who wasn't the registered owner had failed in booting up the machine and called IBM's customer-service line, which still handles the calls although IBM sold its personal-computer division to China's Lenovo earlier this year.

    When the caller gave the machine's serial number, support personnel realized it had been stolen and notified the authorities.

    On Sept. 29, deputies executing a search warrant on a Lincoln home found both the ThinkPad and a pistol that had been stolen in Omaha in 1989.

    They arrested Darrell Brown, 48, on suspicion of possessing stolen property.
    Did Everquest teach you that?

  • #2
    Originally posted by allentrace
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,171617,00.html
    It had to be the dumbest customer-service call ever.

    Lancaster County (search), Neb., sheriff's deputies say a man couldn't get a stolen laptop computer to work — so he called the manufacturer's toll-free tech-support number for help.

    The IBM ThinkPad was reported missing after a rural home burglary Sept. 13, but there were few leads until IBM called, reports the Lincoln (Neb.) Journal-Star.

    It turned out someone who wasn't the registered owner had failed in booting up the machine and called IBM's customer-service line, which still handles the calls although IBM sold its personal-computer division to China's Lenovo earlier this year.

    When the caller gave the machine's serial number, support personnel realized it had been stolen and notified the authorities.

    On Sept. 29, deputies executing a search warrant on a Lincoln home found both the ThinkPad and a pistol that had been stolen in Omaha in 1989.

    They arrested Darrell Brown, 48, on suspicion of possessing stolen property.

    Brilliant, Thats all I have to say, Freaking brilliant.

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    • #3
      heh... probably the tard that posted to the forums with his ebay woes..
      if it gets me nowhere, I'll go there proud; and I'm gonna go there free.

      Comment


      • #4
        It just sounds like he likes to buy 'hot' stuff. Saying he was the thief is a lil premature, but still if he knew it was hot then he's stupid as fuck. However he could argue that he bought it off a friend, etc.
        Delicious Poison:

        The difference between a nerd and a geek? Well a nerd does not wear Spider Man butt huggers.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by klepto
          It just sounds like he likes to buy 'hot' stuff. Saying he was the thief is a lil premature, but still if he knew it was hot then he's stupid as fuck. However he could argue that he bought it off a friend, etc.
          In a lot of jusidictions, Possession of Stolen Property is easier to prove, and may actually carry tougher penalties than Burglary. Sometimes it is dependent on the value of the property, but he may be in just as much trouble, if not more, by merely possessing the laptop and gun than he would be if he is proven to actually have stolen them.

          This is just further proof of what I posted last week: Your average crook is a mouth breather.
          Thorn
          "If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning." - Catherine Aird

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Thorn
            In a lot of jusidictions, Possession of Stolen Property is easier to prove, and may actually carry tougher penalties than Burglary.
            if someone has a valid bill of sale or receipt from an establishment such as a pawn shop or used electronics store, does that ever limit one's liability? i realize that if a product can be clearly proven to have belonged to someone else (from whom it was stolen) then the "owner" wouldn't be entitled to keep it... but would a person still be in trouble for the possession? to what steps does the law state a buyer must go in order to ascertain the legality of an item?

            an electrician that i know buys a lot of tinkering material from a pawn shop near him... in the past when laptops have directories full of important documents and so forth (stuff a normal person would delete before pawning a computer) he's become suspicious and tried to identify the real owners, succeeding at times and in once case being able to return something that was really stolen. let's say he didn't do that. maybe he just chose to buy it, format it outright, and use it as his own. would he then be able to be charged with (well, anyone can be charged with if the physical evidence is there) and found guilty of possession of stolen property?
            Last edited by Deviant Ollam; October 10, 2005, 09:33.
            "I'll admit I had an OiNK account and frequented it quite often… What made OiNK a great place was that it was like the world's greatest record store… iTunes kind of feels like Sam Goody to me. I don't feel cool when I go there. I'm tired of seeing John Mayer's face pop up. I feel like I'm being hustled when I visit there, and I don't think their product is that great. DRM, low bit rate, etc... OiNK it existed because it filled a void of what people want."
            - Trent Reznor

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            • #7
              Originally posted by converge
              heh... probably the tard that posted to the forums with his ebay woes..

              I coulda sworn that was a Dell.
              -Ridirich

              "When you're called upon to do anything, and you're not ready to do it, then you've failed."

              Commander W.H. Hamilton

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Deviant Ollam
                if someone has a valid bill of sale or receipt from an establishment such as a pawn shop or used electronics store, does that ever limit one's liability? i realize that if a product can be clearly proven to have belonged to someone else (from whom it was stolen) then the "owner" wouldn't be entitled to keep it... but would a person still be in trouble for the possession? to what steps does the law state a buyer must go in order to ascertain the legality of an item?

                an electrician that i know buys a lot of tinkering material from a pawn shop near him... in the past when laptops have directories full of important documents and so forth (stuff a normal person would delete before pawning a computer) he's become suspicious and tried to identify the real owners, succeeding at times and in once case being able to return something that was really stolen. let's say he didn't do that. maybe he just chose to buy it, format it outright, and use it as his own. would he then be able to be charged with (well, anyone can be charged with if the physical evidence is there) and found guilty of possession of stolen property?
                Usually, the purchase from a legitimate business like a pawnshop and possession of a receipt would be enough to prove that the current "owner" didn't know the object was stolen. He's still loose it to the police (without reimbursement*), but he's probably dodge a Possession charge. That's assuming that the receipt checks out. The shop might then have issues, as they are supposed to check ownership themselves.

                *Yes, that's right. If you buy something used, and it turns out to be stolen, you're out the money if/when it's seized. The police do not pay you when they seize any item. You may be able to force a civil action with whoever sold you the item, but good luck with that.
                Thorn
                "If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning." - Catherine Aird

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                • #9
                  you would think the guy would've just said nevermind when they asked for the serial number...that's like calling to get parts on a stolen car and giving the dealer the VIN...


                  Web Hosting --

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                  • #10
                    That $5000 laptop will be worth $50 in three years, do you really wanna get busted for $50?

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                    • #11
                      I can back Thorn up on the losing property bit. Friend of mine bought a shotgun a few years ago at a gun show. 'Private Sale' is legal in my state and no background paperwork is required for private parties to sell firearms to each other. He did have a bad feeling about the gun (too good of a deal) and asked a cop buddy to run the serial number. Sure enough, stolen. He (gladly) gave the property over to the police who got it back to its original owner. He wasnt charged with recieving stolen property, as there was no way he could have known, but he did lose the item. In this case, he was glad to give it back (and probably happy that it didnt come back as having been used in a homicide).

                      I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

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                      • #12
                        A friend got a PDA at a garage sale for $20 that was loaded with dates and emails. He called the guy, it was indeed stolen, and the owner happily gave him a $20 reward to cover the recovery cost.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by klepto
                          It just sounds like he likes to buy 'hot' stuff. Saying he was the thief is a lil premature, but still if he knew it was hot then he's stupid as fuck. However he could argue that he bought it off a friend, etc.
                          What I don't get is why he would wait 16 years (1989 to 2005) before he decided to turn on the laptop and use it. Even if he did steal it back then why would you try and get customer service on an electronic boat anchor?
                          Not sure what it is, just that it is.
                          -TehnaD-

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TehnaD
                            What I don't get is why he would wait 16 years (1989 to 2005) before he decided to turn on the laptop and use it. Even if he did steal it back then why would you try and get customer service on an electronic boat anchor?
                            I think the gun had been stolen in 89, not the laptop.

                            I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, it was the gun, not the laptop. The reporter stunk at writting the report and putting things in context.

                              Just think about what that laptop would look like if it were from 1989 it would have looked something like this. Haha, I really doubt anyone would hold onto that for long ;)
                              -Ridirich

                              "When you're called upon to do anything, and you're not ready to do it, then you've failed."

                              Commander W.H. Hamilton

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