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  • #16
    I would prefer to avoid any job where part of the application process involves getting a spinal tap
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    • #17
      Originally posted by bascule
      I would prefer to avoid any job where part of the application process involves getting a spinal tap
      And miss a free spinal tap? Hell man you don't know what you're missing!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by astcell
        And miss a free spinal tap? Hell man you don't know what you're missing!
        Ok.. I am going to be ignorant on this one.. why the hell would a spinal tap be part of the process.. ?
        Happiness is a belt-fed weapon.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by che
          Ok.. I am going to be ignorant on this one.. why the hell would a spinal tap be part of the process.. ?
          sorry, but you're not written into that compartment ...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by che
            Ok.. I am going to be ignorant on this one.. why the hell would a spinal tap be part of the process.. ?
            The FBI has very stringent requirements for their agents regarding their drug use history (in an attempt to hire agents who haven't broken the law) and tests for past use of hard drugs via spinal tap. From http://www.stopthedrugwar.org/chroni...anddrugs.shtml:

            The [FBI], which maintained a strict ban until 1994, now operates under guidelines that allow prospective applicants to have smoked marijuana up to 15 times, though not within the previous three years; hard drugs up to five times, though not within the previous 10 years.

            FBI Denver office spokeswoman Jane Quimby told the Times, "The general preference is still to hire someone who hasn't broken the law, but the harsh reality is... there just aren't that many people." Quimby, who was in charge of Denver police hiring from 1997 to 1999 said that of 35 agents hired on her watch, one-third admitted to having smoked pot.


            So now we can all stand back and laugh at the government's hypocrisy, in that the CIA (and the Bush family) is responsible for the LSD culture in America.
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            • #21
              Originally posted by bascule
              one-third admitted to having smoked pot.
              pot has become a staple of the American culture, all the rap songs the kids like promote it. It is also so widly avalible I dont think i big deal should be made out of it.
              ~:CK:~
              I would like to meet a 1 to keep my 0 company.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ck3k
                pot has become a staple of the American culture, all the rap songs the kids like promote it. It is also so widly avalible I dont think i big deal should be made out of it.
                Unfortunately thanks to an over 200 year old system of government designed around the concepts that technology has since rendered invalid, such as that information takes days or weeks to travel a few hundred miles, and that determining the results of a nationwide vote is cumbersome and difficult process, our national government is 100% representative and provides no means for the population to directly affect political change. Consequently national policy has remained largely stagnant, primarily encompassing the views of the religious right, affected only when corporations buy out elected representatives. It's unlikely we'll see changes in national policy affected until we see the implementation of some sort of national referendum system through a Constitutional amendment.
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                • #23
                  Must you people turn everything political?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by highwizard
                    Must you people turn everything political?
                    I certainly do!
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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by bascule
                      I certainly do!

                      But what's the point?

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                      • #26
                        ... that he's a fucking hippie.
                        "Those who would willingly trade essential liberty for temporary security are deserving of neither." --Benjamin Franklin

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bascule
                          Unfortunately thanks to an over 200 year old system of government designed around the concepts that technology has since rendered invalid, such as that information takes days or weeks to travel a few hundred miles, and that determining the results of a nationwide vote is cumbersome and difficult process, our national government is 100% representative and provides no means for the population to directly affect political change. Consequently national policy has remained largely stagnant, primarily encompassing the views of the religious right, affected only when corporations buy out elected representatives. It's unlikely we'll see changes in national policy affected until we see the implementation of some sort of national referendum system through a Constitutional amendment.
                          That combined with the economic factor. If pot was to become legal, the "powers that be" such as the DEA, etc. would not have nearly as much to do. Show me a narcotics officer that says he wants all drugs to be eradicated and I will show you a fucking liar, they would be out of a job. I have known MANY narc officers in my lifetime, and I can tell you it is a profitable business. (Never mind they could use this additional surplus of manpower to hunt terrorists, etc if they did not have to worry about pot!). It is like the time John McAffee was on "Nightline" right after the Michalangelo virus broke out and said that "Virus writers should all be locked up and viruses must all be destroyed". I'm sure he cried all the way to the bank over the infections..

                          Second, look at the industries that would suffer if growing hemp (it does not even have to be "pot", just industrial hemp) became legal. The textile industries, oil, wood, paper, booze, tobacco, pharmaceutical, etc. industries would all get a swift economic kick in the nutsack. All of these industries would suffer, therefor the politicians they fund would suffer. Why else would it be legal to have more arsenic in children's cereal than THC in adult's shampoo?
                          Last edited by Gadsden; December 10, 2003, 15:13.
                          Happiness is a belt-fed weapon.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by 0versight
                            I thought Spinal Taps were not used anymore? Unconstitutional or something like that? I think I need to find a better news source.
                            Polygraphs are also illegal, but it is amazing how many "pre-employment rights" the US Government is exempt from. Would you expect any less for your tax dollars?

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