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  • #46
    Sherry Chicken (Crock Pot Needed For This One)

    Great easy dish for those of us that go to school, work, or both.

    2 large carrots, sliced
    2 medium onion, quartered
    2 medium stalks of celery
    3 pounds of boneless chicken breasts, cut up
    2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1 cup sherry
    1 tsp basil

    Place carrots, onions and celery in bottom of slow cooker. Add whole chicken. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and sherry. Sprinkle basil on top. Cover and cook on low 8-10 hours, adding 1 cup water, if necessary. Remove chicken and vegetables with spatula. Serve with rice, pasta, or potatos and Enjoy.

    Note: While it may seem like everything I cook has alcohol in it, I promise that I do know how to cook without it, it's just not as fun.
    "It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times". Pearl S. Buck

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    • #47
      Originally posted by lil_freak
      Note: While it may seem like everything I cook has alcohol in it, I promise that I do know how to cook without it, it's just not as fun.
      I agree.. just use my rule: triple the amount of alcohol required, and do a "one for you, two for me" measurement system with the recipie.
      Happiness is a belt-fed weapon.

      Comment


      • #48
        Okay, I know its bad to bring posts back from the grave. However, I'm at work and have no work to do, at least till something breaks down again. So I thought I would post my recipe for Beer and Pork:

        Things needed to make dish:
        2 onion, sliced
        4 pork chops butterfly cut
        2* (12 fluid ounce) cans or bottles beer
        4 cubes chicken bouillon


        DIRECTIONS:
        Arrange onion slices on bottom of slow-cooker. Cut butterfly chops in half and place on top of onions. Pour in beer and add chicken bouillon cubes. Cover and cook and low 6 to 8 hours.

        *Che had a good idea if you like to drink while cooking:
        just use my rule: triple the amount of alcohol required, and do a "one for you, two for me" measurement system with the recipie.
        "It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times". Pearl S. Buck

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by lil_freak
          Okay, I know its bad to bring posts back from the grave......
          no.. far be it from me to say it (and don;t think that it is just because I started this thread) but I think that this could be a nice on-going thread... as we all think of the new stuff we forgot to post just throw it up here... we can all use a new idea for dinner I am sure.
          If I had a nickle for every time someone offered me ten cents to keep my two cents to myself... I would be a rich man.

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          • #50
            Anyone ever cooked a whole pig before? If so, any tips, tricks, recipies, etc? I'm having a BBQ in Feburary and a buddy of mine has a 40lb pig his grandpa bagged last year. I've never grilled anything that large before. I could butcher it, but I kinda like the idea of roasting a whole pig in a pit

            I return whatever i wish . Its called FREEDOWM OF RANDOMNESS IN A HECK . CLUSTERED DEFEATED CORn FORUM . Welcome to me

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            • #51
              Originally posted by noid
              Anyone ever cooked a whole pig before? If so, any tips, tricks, recipies, etc? I'm having a BBQ in Feburary and a buddy of mine has a 40lb pig his grandpa bagged last year. I've never grilled anything that large before. I could butcher it, but I kinda like the idea of roasting a whole pig in a pit
              E-Mail some aborigenes from New Zealand they should know how to do it considering that is what Hollywood has them eat.
              Did Everquest teach you that?

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by noid
                Anyone ever cooked a whole pig before? If so, any tips, tricks, recipies, etc? I'm having a BBQ in Feburary and a buddy of mine has a 40lb pig his grandpa bagged last year. I've never grilled anything that large before. I could butcher it, but I kinda like the idea of roasting a whole pig in a pit
                Buddy of mine from Louisiana does a cochon de lait twice a year, I'll ask him what he does.
                Aut disce aut discede

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                • #53
                  im down with crack sandwiches...or something
                  ARRR!

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by AlxRogan
                    Buddy of mine from Louisiana does a cochon de lait twice a year, I'll ask him what he does.
                    Sounds quite interesting, what is it? I speak French but the cochon is not ringing a bell, is it cajun or creole?
                    Did Everquest teach you that?

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by noid
                      Anyone ever cooked a whole pig before? If so, any tips, tricks, recipies, etc? I'm having a BBQ in Feburary and a buddy of mine has a 40lb pig his grandpa bagged last year. I've never grilled anything that large before. I could butcher it, but I kinda like the idea of roasting a whole pig in a pit
                      Enjoy......

                      1 25-45LB Whole suckling pig, split and washed
                      (If you are going to marinade the pig in something: Place the pig in a large pan and rub with marinade thoroughly. Keep pig in the refrigerator overnight, make sure pig is well submersed.)

                      2. Prop pig's mouth open with aluminum foil. Also cover ears and tail with aluminum foil. Reserve marinade for basting.

                      3. Grill or Roast pig until internal temperature reads 160ยบ, about 4 to 5 hours.


                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      Originally posted by h3adrush
                      im down with crack sandwiches...or something
                      h3adrush!!!
                      No wonder I do the cooking.
                      "It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times". Pearl S. Buck

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        see why I think we should keep this one open? ... what about scallops... anyone? I just picked some up and realized... I have no clue how to cook them... 'cept for deep fried like a good hillbilly
                        If I had a nickle for every time someone offered me ten cents to keep my two cents to myself... I would be a rich man.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Noid,
                          I have attended a couple of Ky. Derby events (parties), both of which the host had roasted a large pig. I was told that it took about 18- 24 hrs to cook the pig, depending on its weight, and the method of cooking. I found a couple of links that may be of some help.
                          http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-001/458-001.html
                          http://www.askthemeatman.com/pit_coo..._whole_hog.htm

                          Good Luck!

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Siviak
                            what about scallops... anyone?
                            I only know how to bake them......


                            4 tablespoons butter, melted
                            1 1/2 pounds scallops, rinsed and drained
                            1/2 cup seasoned dry bread crumbs
                            1 teaspoon onion powder
                            1 teaspoon garlic powder
                            1/2 teaspoon paprika
                            1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
                            3 cloves garlic, minced
                            1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese




                            Preheat oven to 400 degrees
                            Pour melted butter into a 2 quart casserole dish. Add butter and scallops evenly inside the dish.
                            Combine the bread crumbs, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, parsley, minced garlic and Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle this mixture over the scallops.
                            Bake in pre-heated oven until scallops are firm, about 20 minutes.

                            My grandma knows how to cook them other ways, so if you don't want to bake them, pm me and I'll find out how she cooks hers.


                            /me thinks that I might need some new hobbies aside from computers, guns, and cooking. Then again if I give up cooking I think the dc719 might starve to death.
                            "It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times". Pearl S. Buck

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by lil_freak
                              I only know how to bake them......



                              /me thinks that I might need some new hobbies aside from computers, guns, and cooking. Then again if I give up cooking I think the dc719 might starve to death.
                              yep, we would all shrivel up like super models. =]
                              ARRR!

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by allentrace
                                Sounds quite interesting, what is it? I speak French but the cochon is not ringing a bell, is it cajun or creole?
                                It's Cajun french, literally "pig of milk" or something like that. I'll reply back when I hear from my friend, but here's a nice candid pic of him and Medic getting *personal* with a good sized pig. I can't remember the exact size, but he was at least 70 lbs, and the number 125 sticks in my head. Course I drank quite a bit of Bock that weekend, so my recall isn't excellent.

                                http://www.shsu.edu/~ucs_tim/pics/Lo.../photo_20.html
                                Aut disce aut discede

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